All Stories

  1. Chemistry

    Stinky success: Scientists identify the chemistry of B.O.

    They turned up the enzyme in bacteria behind that underarm stench. Understanding how it works could pave the way to new types of deodorant.

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  2. Archaeology

    Let’s learn about ancient technology

    Ancient people didn’t have the internet. Instead, they performed surgeries, made weapons and built monuments with wood, stones, rope and fire.

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  3. Chemistry

    Scientists say: Chemical

    A chemical is anything made of two or more atoms bonded together in a fixed structure. Chemicals make up the world around us.

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  4. Animals

    Quacks and toots help young honeybee queens avoid deadly duels

    It’s not just ducks that quack. Honey bees do it too. They also toot. Researchers eavesdropped on hives to find out why.

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  5. Health & Medicine

    Healthy screen time is one challenge of distance learning

    How you use screens is more important than the amount of time you spend on them. Sit less, experts say, and use those screens mainly to learn and engage with others.

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  6. Psychology

    A secret of science: Mistakes boost understanding

    Everyone makes mistakes. It turns out that how you view them says a lot about how — and how much — you’ll learn.

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  7. Psychology

    Top 10 tips on how to study smarter, not longer

    Here are 10 tips — all based on science — about what tends to help us learn and remember most effectively.

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  8. Health & Medicine

    Four summer camps show how to limit COVID-19 outbreak

    Schools might take a lesson from these overnight facilities in Maine. They kept infection rates low by testing a lot and grouping kids into ‘bubbles.’

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  9. Health & Medicine

    Here’s how COVID-19 is changing classes this year

    To keep students and teachers safe from COVID-19, some things in the classroom are changing — and sometimes entire schools are being kept closed.

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  10. Animals

    A single chemical may draw lonely locusts into a hungry swarm

    Swarms of locusts can destroy crops. Scientists have discovered a chemical that might make locusts come together in huge hungry swarms.

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