All Stories

  1. Health & Medicine

    Experts rethink need for X-ray shielding of patients

    For close to 70 years, workers who perform X-ray scans of the body have been advised to shield sensitive tissues with lead 'aprons.' That may soon stop.

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  2. Health & Medicine

    New success in treating allergies to peanuts and other foods

    Nearly 8 million U.S. children have food allergies, about two per classroom. The good news: Better ways to treat them are emerging.

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  3. Health & Medicine

    Food allergies can trigger stress and anxiety

    From peanut-free lunch tables to unsympathetic relatives, food allergies can cause considerable stress for a kid. As they transition toward independence, parents and counselors can help.

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  4. Health & Medicine

    Explainer: What are allergies?

    Sometimes the body’s immune system works too well, like a smoke alarm that blares every time you cook pizza. The results can range from uncomfortable to potentially life-threatening.

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  5. Humans

    Testing the power of touch

    We pet dogs with our fingers, not our arms or backs. Our fingers are more sensitive to touch. But how do we know? Here's how you can test that.

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  6. Science & Society

    Study links racism with signs of depression in Black teens

    Among teens, just two weeks of frequent racial discrimination was enough to worsen signs of possible depression, a new study finds.

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  7. Materials Science

    New twist can hush — even cloak — some sounds

    Swiss engineers developed clear, spiral structures to make a new sound-dampening system. Those twists block some vibrations and lets others through.

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  8. Animals

    Drones might one day capture a dolphin’s breath in midair

    High-speed footage of dolphin spray reveals that droplets blast upward at speeds close to 100 kilometers per hour.

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  9. Physics

    Scientists Say: Decibel

    A decibel is a unit of measurement that describes a sound’s volume. It’s used for sounds that are in the range of human hearing.

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  10. Math

    Color-changing fibers help unravel a knotty problem

    Experiments with colorful fibers helped scientists discover a few simple rules on why the strength of various types of knots differs.

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