Carolyn Gramling

Earth & Climate Writer, Science News

Carolyn is the Earth & Climate writer at Science News. Previously she worked at Science magazine for six years, both as a reporter covering paleontology and polar science and as the editor of the news in brief section. Before that she was a reporter and editor at EARTH magazine. She has bachelor’s degrees in Geology and European History and a Ph.D. in marine geochemistry from MIT and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. She’s also a former Science News intern.

All Stories by Carolyn Gramling

  1. Climate

    New research may alter what we know about how tornadoes form

    New data suggest that the twisters don’t form from the top down.

  2. Climate

    Climate change greatly intensified many 2017 weather events

    Climate change increased the likelihood of 16 extreme weather events in 2017 — including one that couldn’t have happened without it.

  3. Climate

    Explainer: Why sea levels aren’t rising at the same rate globally

    The ocean is rising all over the world. The rise seems speedier in some places. What gives? Many factors, it turns out, affect where — and why — the tide gets high.

  4. Earth

    A massive crater hides under Greenland’s ice

    Radar images point to a crater buried deep under ice in Greenland. Meltwater from the site suggest an asteroid created it. Did this collision trigger a thousand-year global cooling?

  5. Fossils

    T. rex pulverized bones with an incredible amount of force

    Tyrannosaurus rex’s powerful bite and remarkably strong teeth helped the dinosaur crush bones.

  6. Science & Society

    Half a degree can make a world of difference

    Limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius versus 2 has big benefits, says a new report from the IPCC.

  7. Climate

    Hurricane Michael slams into Florida, then speeds north

    The 2018 hurricane season just brought Michael, another rapidly strengthening hurricane, to the U.S. coast. This one hit land with surprising power.

  8. Environment

    Enormous floating barrier will corral ocean trash

    A floating giant barrier has been designed to trap plastic trash in the ocean. But no one’s sure how well it will collect much of the most worrisome type.

  9. Earth

    Scientists find an easier way to trap carbon dioxide in rock

    Scientists have found a much faster and easier way to trap CO2 in minerals. If they can scale it up, it might one day help to slow climate change.

  10. Climate

    Climate change intensified Hurricane Florence, study finds

    A new study finds that a warmer climate fattened up Florence. The result: Once it made landfall it would now drop lots more rain and over a broader region.