Lisa Grossman

Astronomy Writer, Science News

Lisa Grossman is the astronomy writer for Science News. Previously she was a news editor at New Scientist, where she ran the physical sciences section of the magazine for three years. Before that, she spent three years at New Scientist as a reporter, covering space, physics and astronomy. She has a degree in astronomy from Cornell University and a graduate certificate in science writing from the University of California, Santa Cruz. Lisa was a finalist for the AGU David Perlman Award for Excellence in Science Journalism, and received the Institute of Physics/Science and Technology Facilities Council physics writing award and the AAS Solar Physics Division Popular Writing Award. She interned at Science News in 2009-2010.

All Stories by Lisa Grossman

  1. Space

    Developing planet emerges in a swirl of gas

    Images of a young star 520 light-years away show a spiral of gas and dust swirling around it. A twist inside the spiral appears to be a planet forming.

  2. Space

    Oldest disk galaxy puts a new spin on galaxy growth

    A spinning disk galaxy has been found in the early universe. Its existence is a surprise.

  3. Space

    Astronauts may be able to make cement with their own pee

    Lunar dust and a compound found in urine might one day be used to build future dwellings on the moon, a new study finds.

  4. Space

    A first: Commercial rocket takes humans into space

    Two NASA astronauts aboard the privately built Crew Dragon capsule are the first to be sent into orbit from U.S. soil since 2011.

  5. Planets

    Planets with hydrogen skies could harbor life

    Microbes can live in a hydrogen atmosphere. This points to new space worlds that host alien life.

  6. A seventh grader named NASA’s newest Mars rover

    NASA’s next Mars rover will be called Perseverance.

  7. Space

    Rover finds ‘layer cake’ below ground on moon’s farside

    China’s rover finds the moon’s farside is more rugged and cratered than the nearside. Now scientists want to know why.

  8. Planets

    Spotted: An exoplanet where it might rain

    A planet outside the solar system appears to have clouds with liquid water.

  9. Planets

    Physics Nobel rewards discoveries on cosmic evolution and exoplanets

    This trio of scientists helped figure out the makeup of our universe. Two of them also identified the first known exoplanet orbiting a sunlike star.

  10. Planets

    Students help name 5 of Jupiter’s newly discovered moons

    Astronomers announced discovering 12 new moons of Jupiter in July 2018. Five of them now just been named for goddesses and spirits of Greek and Roman mythology.

  11. Planets

    Welcome to moon rock central

    A Science News reporter’s visit to NASA’s moon-rock lab shows the hyper-pristine conditions in which these rocks are kept — and why that’s so important.

  12. Physics

    If dark matter particles could kill us, they would have already

    Dark matter is a mysterious substance. The fact that no one has been killed by it suggests it is relatively small and light.