Sharon Oosthoek

Freelance Writer

Sharon Oosthoek is a freelance science journalist who lives in Toronto, Canada. She has written about how bed bugs have favorite colors, why your shoelaces untie themselves and how chicken cologne can protect you from malaria.

 

She likes writing for young readers. They ask good questions, like how do scientists know the Earth is warming?

 

Sharon also writes for adults. Her articles have appeared in New Scientist, Canadian Geographic, Maclean’s, The Globe and Mail, cbc.ca and Chemical & Engineering News. She is the winner of an American Academy for the Advancement of Science Kavli Science Journalism Award for children’s science writing.

All Stories by Sharon Oosthoek

  1. Environment

    Fish get pooped living in polluted water

    Living in polluted water can tire fish out, a new study finds. This can make it harder for them to find food and avoid being eaten, themselves, by predators.

  2. Agriculture

    New ‘tattoo’ could lead to drought-tolerant crops

    Scientists create stick-on 'plant tattoo.' It measures how efficiently crops use water, a key to better identifying breeding stock for more drought-resistant crops.

  3. Brain

    Woodpecker brains host protein linked with human brain damage

    Woodpeckers peck with a force great enough to give people concussions. Now a study shows that birds, too, may suffer some brain damage.

  4. Climate

    Climate change threatens future Winter Olympics

    Higher temperatures, less snow mean many former Winter Olympics sites soon will no longer qualify to host future games, concludes a new analysis.

  5. Brain

    Trading smartphone time for sleep? Your loss

    A new study shows more and more teenagers are hanging out on devices when they should be catching ZZZs, putting their health at risk.

  6. Animals

    Humpbacks flap their flippers like underwater birds

    Surprising new video shows humpback whales flapping their front flippers to move their massive bodies toward their prey.

  7. Animals

    Beware the tap of the narwhal’s tusk

    A new video shows narwhals using their tusks to tap fish before eating them. They might be stunning their prey — or just playing with their food.

  8. Health & Medicine

    Is your home chilly? This might just be healthy

    Feeling mildly cold (or a bit too warm) forces the body to adjust what it’s doing to maintain a healthy temperature. And that can do a body good, data now show.

  9. Life

    Weird mega-worm found to have odd diet

    Giant shipworms have bacteria in their gills that produce food for them. This has made their digestive organs shrink from lack of use.

  10. Physics

    Why your shoelaces untie themselves

    High-speed video shows how the combined motions of a shoe’s swinging and landing on the ground provoke shoelaces to come untied.