Heredity: Inheritance and Variation of Traits

  1. Agriculture

    Livestock: A need to save rare breeds

    New studies and ongoing work highlight why society should save rare livestock breeds — and the part that technology can play.

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  2. Genetics

    Why animals often ‘stand in’ for people

    Rats, birds, fish — even flies and worms — can stand in for people in laboratory testing. This allows scientists to safely evaluate harmful chemicals as well as to identify and test potential new drugs. But such tests will never be a foolproof gauge of effects in people.

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  3. Microbes

    Germs help each other fend off antibiotics

    Drug-resistant bacteria can cause persistent infections. A new study finds these germs fight drugs in different ways. And they can swap various compounds, increasing their neighbors’ chances of overcoming the drugs meant to kill them.

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  4. Genetics

    High-altitude help from extinct ancestors

    The Tibetan plateau is high in altitude but low in oxygen. An unusual version of one gene in Tibetans' DNA helps them survive this environment. And that gene appears to have been passed along from Denisovans, a Neandertal-like ancestor.

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  5. Genetics

    Newfound DNA ‘enhancer’ behind many natural blonds

    Some snippets of DNA other than genes play a role in giving some people of European a golden crown of hair.

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  6. Animals

    When a species can’t stand the heat

    When temperatures rise, New Zealand’s tuatara produce more males. With global warming, that could leave the ancient reptile species with too few females to avoid going extinct.

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  7. Health & Medicine

    Teen uncovers new weapons to stop Huntington’s disease

    David Seong, an Intel Science Talent Search finalist, is studying how tiny pieces of genetic material might be used to lock up a dangerous protein in Huntington’s disease.

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  8. Health & Medicine

    Simple test for cancer and heart disease

    Disease diagnosis often requires expensive equipment and tests to probe deep inside the body. But a new test relies on a fast, cheap and easy technique. And its answers appear on a strip of paper — just as they do on a pregnancy test.

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  9. Brain

    Why boys face higher autism risk

    Boys develop autism at four times the rate seen in girls. Girls’ genes are better protected from the mutations linked to this brain disorder, data now suggest.

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  10. Life

    Caught in the act

    Scientists observe some evolutionary speed demons as they adapt over the course of just a few years to new environmental conditions.

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  11. Animals

    Churk: Not for Thanksgiving

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  12. Animals

    Glow kitties

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