HS-ESS1-4

Use mathematical or computational representations to predict the motion of orbiting objects in the solar system.

More Stories in HS-ESS1-4

  1. Oceans

    Moon’s orbital wobble can add to sea-level rise and flooding

    In a dozen years or so, the tide-enhancing effects of a wobble in the moon’s orbit should lead to dramatically higher sea levels in some coastal cities.

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  2. Space

    This image may be the first look at exomoons in the making

    These observations offer some of the best evidence yet that planets around other stars have moons, or exomoons.

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  3. Space

    Born in deep shadows? That could explain Jupiter’s strange makeup

    Dust that blocked sunlight might have caused the gas giant to form in a deep freeze, a new study suggests.

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  4. Space

    Cosmic filaments may have the biggest spin in outer space

    These rotating threads of dark matter and galaxies stretch millions of light-years. Scientists want to know how their spin begins.

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  5. Space

    Moon-sized white dwarf is the smallest ever found

    This dead star is also spinning very fast and has an amazingly powerful magnetic field.

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  6. Space

    Spin in this Milky Way bar may show cosmic dark matter does exist

    A method akin to studying a tree’s rings reveals the timeline of a slowdown in those stars at the heart of our Milky Way galaxy.

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  7. Space

    Huge arc of galaxies is surprising and puzzling cosmologists

    The arc appears to violate a cosmic rule that on such large scales, matter will be evenly distributed.

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  8. Space

    Stars made of antimatter could lurk in our galaxy

    Fourteen sources of gamma rays in our galaxy look like they could be antistars — celestial bodies made of antimatter.

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  9. Planets

    The pebbled path to planets

    Small pebbles zipping through a sea of gas may give rise to mighty planets.

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