HS-ESS2-2

Analyze geoscience data to make the claim that one change to Earth's surface can create feedbacks that cause changes to other Earth systems.

More Stories in HS-ESS2-2

  1. Earth

    The Alps’ Matterhorn shows how much even big mountains sway

    Such mountain sway data can help planners map high-risk zones for peaks, bridges or any large structures.

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  2. Earth

    Let’s learn about Earth’s secret stash of underground water

    Groundwater provides drinking water to billions of people and is used to water crops worldwide.

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  3. Earth

    Let’s learn about tornadoes

    Tornadoes are often spawned by thunderstorms — but can also emerge from hurricanes and wildfires.

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  4. Earth

    The ‘Doomsday’ glacier may soon trigger a dramatic sea-level rise

    The ice shelf that had kept it in place could fail within five years. That would speed the glacier’s slip into the ocean, boosting a rise in sea levels.

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  5. Life

    From icebergs to smoke, forecasting where dangers will drift

    Smoke drifts. Fish eggs float downstream. Where such drifting things end up may seem a mystery. But research can predict where they’ll end up.

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  6. Earth

    Scientists Say: Avalanche

    The word avalanche usually refers to a huge snowslide down a mountain, but it can also be used to describe any large mass of material tumbling downhill.

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  7. Earth

    What can ‘silent earthquakes’ teach us about the next Big One?

    Earthquakes usually last seconds. But sometimes, they can last days, or even years. Here’s what scientists are learning about these “slow-slip events.”

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  8. Space

    Let’s learn about auroras

    A gust of charged particles from the sun called the solar wind lights up auroras on Earth — and on other planets.

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  9. Earth

    Scientists Say: Magma and lava

    The word magma refers to molten rock deep inside Earth. That rock is called lava when it reaches Earth’s surface.

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