HS-LS1-2

Develop and use a model to illustrate the hierarchical organization of interacting systems that provide specific functions within multicellular organisms.

More Stories in HS-LS1-2

  1. Brain

    Search for ‘rewards’ is big driver in remodeling a teen’s brain

    Communication ‘highways’ in the brain undergo a major overhaul as children morph into adults. Dopamine plays a big role in this remodeling project.

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  2. Brain

    Scientists Say: Neuron

    Neurons are the foundational cells in the nervous system. They pass along and process information using electrical signals.

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  3. Brain

    Teen depression linked to how the brain processes rewards

    Depression in teens alters their brains’ pathways in ways that may put those kids at risk of lifelong mental-health problems — unless they get help.

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  4. Space

    Space travel may harm health by damaging cells’ powerhouses

    Biochemical changes after going to space suggest that harm to cells’ energy-producing structures, called mitochondria, could explain astronauts’ health issues.

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  5. Scientists Say: Respiration

    Breathe in and out, that’s respiration. Have a cell break down sugars for energy, and that’s respiration too.

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  6. Brain

    A taste map in the brain is a scattering of tiny flavor islands

    Some senses are highly organized in the brain. Taste is not. And that points to just how important it is.

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  7. Animals

    Touching allows octopuses to pre-taste their food

    Special sensory cells in their arms’ suckers sense chemicals. Those cells allow them to taste the difference between food and poison.

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  8. Health & Medicine

    Strongest bones come from Goldilocks recipe of exercise and rest

    Building strong bones for life depends on adolescents staying active and getting enough sleep. Sometimes a lot of sleep, like 11 hours!

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  9. Life

    Ogre-faced spiders listen closely to snatch bugs from the air

    Ogre-faced spiders can hear prey sneaking around behind them. Low frequencies can trigger a blind, backwards attack.

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