HS-LS1-7

Use a model to illustrate that cellular respiration is a chemical process whereby the bonds of food molecules and oxygen molecules are broken and the bonds in new compounds are formed resulting in a net transfer of energy.

More Stories in HS-LS1-7

  1. Animals

    Here’s how sea otters stay warm without blubber or a large body

    For the smallest mammal in the ocean, staying warm is tough. Now, scientists have figured out how the animals’ cells rise to the challenge.

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  2. Earth

    ‘Tree farts’ make up about a fifth of greenhouse gases from ghost forests

    Heat-trapping gases from dead trees play an important role in the environmental impact of “ghost” forests.

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  3. Health & Medicine

    Cool Jobs: Saliva offers a spitting image of our health

    Scientists are using this secretion to study our body’s functions, to test for disease and even to diagnose injury.

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  4. Microbes

    Several plant-like algae can morph into animal-like predators

    Single-celled green algae swim through water as free cells. Most use only photosynthesis for their energy. But not all of them, a new study shows.

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  5. Animals

    Analyze This: Cows burp less methane after early-life treatment

    Calves that receive the 14-week treatment belch less of the greenhouse gas, possibly due to shifts in their gut microbes.

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  6. Scientists Say: Respiration

    Breathe in and out, that’s respiration. Have a cell break down sugars for energy, and that’s respiration too.

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  7. Health & Medicine

    Warning! Junk foods can harm a teen’s brain

    The adolescent brain has a hard time resisting junk food. But high-fat, high-sugar diets can interfere with learning and pose risks to mental health.

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  8. Planets

    Planets with hydrogen skies could harbor life

    Microbes can live in a hydrogen atmosphere. This points to new space worlds that host alien life.

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  9. Physics

    There’s science to making great fried rice

    Scientists report finding the physics that seems to explain how chefs can quickly fry rice over a hot flame without burning the food.

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