HS-LS2-2

Use mathematical representations to support and revise explanations based on evidence about factors affecting biodiversity and populations in ecosystems of different scales.

More Stories in HS-LS2-2

  1. Animals

    As the tropics warm, some birds are shrinking

    Migratory birds are getting smaller as temperatures climb, studies had showed. New evidence shows dozens of tropical, nonmigratory species are, too.

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  2. Animals

    A panda stands out at the zoo but blends in the wild

    A panda may stand out among the bamboo at the zoo, but in the wild, its black-and-white coloring camouflages it from predators, a new study finds.

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  3. Ecosystems

    Secret forest fungi partner with plants — and help the climate

    Forest fungi are far more than mere mushrooms. They explore. They move nutrients and messages between plants. They can even help fight climate change.

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  4. Animals

    Baleen whales eat — and poop — a lot more than we thought

    The amount of food that some whales eat and then poop out suggests these animals have a powerful influence over ocean ecosystems.

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  5. Animals

    Cockatoos learn from each other how to open garbage bins

    The bin-opening behavior is an example of social learning. It’s also the basis of a foraging culture. Learn more in this web comic.

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  6. Genetics

    Explainer: What is RNA?

    A partner to DNA, cells use this molecule to translate the instructions for making all of the many proteins that your body needs to function.

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  7. Plants

    Well-known wildflower turns out to be a secret meat-eater

    Look closely at Triantha occidentalis, and you’ll see gluey hairs — and a trail of insect corpses on its stem.

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  8. Animals

    Analyze This: Some female hummingbirds go undercover

    Some female white-necked jacobin hummingbirds boast bright blue colors similar to males. That may help females blend in to avoid attacks.

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  9. Environment

    Cheatgrass thrives on the well-lit urban night scene

    Middle-grade campers team up with ecologists at Denver University to show that streetlights boost the growth of a reviled invasive species.

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