HS-LS2-4

Use a mathematical representation to support claims for the cycling of matter and flow of energy among organisms in an ecosystem.

More Stories in HS-LS2-4

  1. Agriculture

    Soil (and its inhabitants) by the numbers

    Teeming with life, soils have more going on than most of us realize.

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  2. Environment

    What you can do to improve soils

    Soils are the life-sustaining structures under our feet. Here are some tips for keeping soils healthy. First rule of thumb: Give more than you take.

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  3. Environment

    Jumping ‘snake worms’ are invading U.S. forests

    These bad-news invaders are spreading across the United States. As they turn forest debris into bare ground, soils and ecosystems are changing.

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  4. Plants

    The faster trees grow, the younger they die

    As climate change spurs forest tree growth, it also shortens trees’ lives. That results in a quicker release of climate-warming carbon back into the atmosphere.

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  5. Animals

    Whales get a second life as deep-sea buffets

    When a whale dies and sinks to the seafloor, it becomes a feast for hundreds of different types of creatures.

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  6. A dirty and growing problem: Too few toilets

    As the famous book says, everybody poops. That’s 7.8 billion people, worldwide. For the 2.4 billion with no toilet, the process can be complicated.

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  7. Environment

    Greener than burial? Turning human bodies into worm food

    Composting human bodies yielded good results — and good soil — in one small study. It could become an alternative to burial or cremation in one state.

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  8. Oceans

    Small swimmers may play huge role in churning the seas

    Hoards of migrating shrimp and krill can cause large-scale water movements in the ocean, a new study suggests.

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  9. Climate

    Analyze This: Climate change could make food less healthy

    Levels of important nutrients are lower in crops exposed to high levels of carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas. How high? Try levels expected to be typical 30 years from now.

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