HS-LS3-1

Ask questions to clarify relationships about the role of DNA and chromosomes in coding the instructions for characteristic traits passed from parents to offspring.

More Stories in HS-LS3-1

  1. Life

    These rabbits can’t hop. A gene defect makes them do handstands

    Mutations in a gene that helps nerve cells work properly rob rabbits of their ability to hop. Instead, the animals use their front paws to move.

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  2. Animals

    Science and Indigenous history team up to help spirit bears

    When scientists and Indigenous people work together, their efforts can benefit bears and people.

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  3. Genetics

    Let’s learn about DNA

    DNA is made of two chemical chains twisted around each other. It stores information that allows cells to grow and function.

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  4. Life

    Scientists Say: Egg and sperm

    An egg or a sperm cell contains half of the normal genes an organism needs. They fuse together to form a new individual.

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  5. Humans

    By not including everyone, genome science has blind spots

    Little diversity in genetic databases makes precision medicine hard for many. One historian proposes a solution, but some scientists doubt it’ll work.

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  6. Space

    Space travel may harm health by damaging cells’ powerhouses

    Biochemical changes after going to space suggest that harm to cells’ energy-producing structures, called mitochondria, could explain astronauts’ health issues.

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  7. Humans

    Some identical twins don’t have the exact same DNA

    Identical twins may not be exactly identical. Mutations may arise early in development that account for tiny genetic differences between siblings.

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  8. Genetics

    Gene editing can alter body fat and may fight diabetes

    Researchers have long dreamed of using brown fat to fight obesity and diabetes. Work in animals shows they’re closing in on achieving that dream.

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  9. Chemistry

    2020 chemistry Nobel goes for CRISPR, the gene-editing tool

    Only eight years after its development, CRISPR has revolutionized genetics. It also just brought Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer Doudna acclaim.

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