HS-PS1-2

Construct and revise an explanation for the outcome of a simple chemical reaction based on the outermost electron states of atoms, trends in the periodic table, and knowledge of the patterns of chemical properties.

More Stories in HS-PS1-2

  1. Chemistry

    Explainer: Ions and radicals in our world

    When atoms get an electric charge, they act very differently. Now called ions, these are behind many aspects of chemistry, including acids and batteries.

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  2. Chemistry

    Scientists Say: Bond

    In chemistry, this attachment between atoms forms because of the power of attraction. Chemical bonds make up every solid object on Earth.

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  3. Planets

    The Perseverance rover split CO2 on Mars to make breathable air

    This oxygen-making experiment shows that astronauts could one day make air to breathe and to help fuel their ride back home.

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  4. Chemistry

    Explainer: What are chemical bonds?

    When various particles, atoms, ions or molecules come together to form a substance, they are held together with chemical bonds.

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  5. Chemistry

    Let’s learn about acids and bases

    Acids give away particles with positive charge. Bases accept positively charged particles. They are both critical for chemical reactions.

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  6. Chemistry

    A new catalyst turns greenhouse gas into jet fuel

    The catalyst is an improvement over its predecessors. Made of cheap materials like iron, it produces jet fuel in a single step.

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  7. Chemistry

    Study acid-base chemistry with at-home volcanoes

    Baking soda volcanoes are a fun demonstration, and with a few tweaks they can be an experiment, too

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  8. Physics

    The exotic ‘atom’ positronium surprises scientists

    New measurements of a weird but simple atom, one without a nucleus, suggest it may have unexpected properties. Scientists find this troubling.

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  9. Tech

    Here’s one way to harvest water right out of the air

    Need water but you have no access to rain, lakes or groundwater? Materials known as metal-organic frameworks could be used to slurp that water from the air, new data show.

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