HS-PS1-5

Apply scientific principles and evidence to provide an explanation about the effects of changing the temperature or concentration of the reacting particles on the rate at which a reaction occurs.

More Stories in HS-PS1-5

  1. Chemistry

    This tube worm’s glowing slime may help sustain its own shine

    Snot oozed by a marine tube worm can glow for up to 3 full days. The secret of how this works might lead to long-lasting lights that glow on and on.

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  2. Tech

    COVID-19 victims could breathe easier with these innovations

    Feared equipment shortages due to the COVID-19 pandemic have prompted research teams to develop novel technologies to help oxygen-starved lungs.

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  3. Chemistry

    Rock Candy Science 2: No such thing as too much sugar

    Making rock candy at home takes a lot more sugar than you might think. Why? This experiment will show you why.

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  4. Chemistry

    Banana plant extract can slow how fast ice cream melts

    Food scientists now show that adding these tiny plant particles to ice cream may delay the rate at which this treat melts into a soupy mess.

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  5. Chemistry

    Scientists Say: Catalyst

    Sometimes a chemical reaction can take a while. If speed is needed, a catalyst can help.

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  6. Environment

    Trees can make summer ozone levels much worse

    The greenery can release chemicals into the air that react with combustion pollutants to make ozone. And trees release more of those chemicals where it gets really hot, a new study finds.

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  7. Earth

    Ancient Arctic ‘gas’ melt triggered enormous seafloor explosions

    Methane explosions 12,000 years ago left huge craters in bedrock on the Arctic seafloor. Scientists worry more could be on the way today as Earth’s ice sheets melt.

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  8. Planets

    How Earth got its moon

    How did our moon form? Scientists are still debating the answer. It may be the result of some one big impact with Earth — or perhaps many small ones.

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  9. Chemistry

    Here’s how hot water might freeze faster than cold

    There’s a new explanation for how hot water freezes faster than cold water. But not everyone agrees it’s right, or that the effect can happen at all.

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