HS-PS2-6

Communicate scientific and technical information about why the molecular-level structure is important in the functioning of designed materials.

More Stories in HS-PS2-6

  1. Humans

    The earliest known pants are surprisingly modern — and comfy

    This 3,000-year-old garment was not only stylish but also functional. By recreating it, scientists also unraveled its complex and multicultural origins.

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  2. Life

    Scientists Say: Cellulose

    Cellulose is an abundant natural polymer found in plants and algae. It’s used to make everything from paper to clothing.

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  3. Environment

    Scientists Say: Pollution

    Pollution is any substance or form of energy released into the environment that is harmful to people or other living creatures.

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  4. Environment

    Clothes dryers may be a major source of airborne microplastics

    Scientists thought washing machines were a leading contributor of microplastics. Now it appears dryers may be an even bigger problem.

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  5. Materials Science

    Let’s learn about glass

    Unlike the atoms in other solids, the atoms in glass don’t exist in an orderly crystal structure. They’re more jumbled up, like the atoms inside liquids.

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  6. Tech

    This crumb-sized camera uses artificial intelligence to get big results

    Researchers have developed a camera the size of a coarse grain of salt that takes amazingly clear photos.

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  7. Chemistry

    Snail slime + gold could boost the power of sunscreens and more

    These two strange ingredients could make skin-care products that are better for both our skin and the environment.

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  8. Materials Science

    Analyze This: This material for 3-D printing is made by microbes

    Bacteria with tweaked genes pump out proteins that can be used in a 3-D printer. With microbes in the mix, the living ink can make drugs or suck up chemicals.

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  9. Chemistry

    Could reusable ‘jelly ice’ cubes replace regular ice?

    These hydrogel “jelly ice cubes” are made mostly of gelatin and water. They won’t melt, even when thawed, and may provide new food cooling options.

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