HS-PS4-4

Evaluate the validity and reliability of claims in published materials of the effects that different frequencies of electromagnetic radiation have when absorbed by matter.

More Stories in HS-PS4-4

  1. Planets

    Let’s learn about Mars

    Traveling to Mars offers many challenges, including life without gravity, cosmic rays and communication delays.

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  2. Tech

    ‘Frozen smoke’ could protect electronics from annoying static

    A fluffy material made from cellulose nanofibers and silver nanowires can protect electronic devices by blocking more than 99.99 percent of disrupting interference, a new study reveals.

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  3. Life

    If bacteria stick together, they can survive for years in space

    Tiny clumps of bacteria can survive at least three years in outer space. This raises the prospect of interplanetary travel by microbial life.

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  4. Physics

    Understanding light and other forms of energy on the move

    Radiation needn’t be scary, especially if it allows us to see our family or use our cell phones. Here’s a guide to light and other types of emitted energy.

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  5. Oceans

    Going bright may help corals recover from bleaching

    When some corals bleach, they turn neon colors. Flashy hues may be part of a response that helps these corals recover and reunite with their algae.

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  6. Chemistry

    This tube worm’s glowing slime may help sustain its own shine

    Snot oozed by a marine tube worm can glow for up to 3 full days. The secret of how this works might lead to long-lasting lights that glow on and on.

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  7. Physics

    Explainer: Rainbows, fogbows and their eerie cousins

    Light shining through a water droplet can make more than just a rainbow. A range of other colorful arcs also can develop.

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  8. Health & Medicine

    New ultrasound treatment kills off cancer cells

    Low-frequency ultrasound destroys cancer cells while leaving most healthy cells intact.

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  9. Science & Society

    Science isn’t just for scientists

    It doesn’t take an advanced degree or a lab to do science. All you need is curiosity and an interest in learning something new every day.

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