MS-ESS2-2

Construct an explanation based on evidence for how geoscience processes have changed Earth's surface at varying time and spatial scales.

More Stories in MS-ESS2-2

  1. Earth

    Volcanic avalanches may be more destructive than previously thought

    Pressures within these pyroclastic flows may be as much as three times as high as observations had suggested.

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  2. Earth

    The ‘Doomsday’ glacier may soon trigger a dramatic sea-level rise

    The ice shelf that had kept it in place could fail within five years. That would speed the glacier’s slip into the ocean, boosting a rise in sea levels.

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  3. Life

    From icebergs to smoke, forecasting where dangers will drift

    Smoke drifts. Fish eggs float downstream. Where such drifting things end up may seem a mystery. But research can predict where they’ll end up.

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  4. Earth

    Scientists Say: Avalanche

    The word avalanche usually refers to a huge snowslide down a mountain, but it can also be used to describe any large mass of material tumbling downhill.

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  5. Oceans

    Scientists Say: Atoll

    Atolls form when coral reefs build up around underwater volcanoes.

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  6. Earth

    What can ‘silent earthquakes’ teach us about the next Big One?

    Earthquakes usually last seconds. But sometimes, they can last days, or even years. Here’s what scientists are learning about these “slow-slip events.”

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  7. Earth

    Scientists Say: Magma and lava

    The word magma refers to molten rock deep inside Earth. That rock is called lava when it reaches Earth’s surface.

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  8. Earth

    Scientists Say: Anthropocene

    Humans are changing the world in profound ways. Some scientists think those changes have launched a new epoch in Earth’s history: the Anthropocene.

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  9. Earth

    Greece’s Santorini volcano erupts more when the sea level drops

    Data showing this association go back at least 360,000 years.

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