MS-ESS3-2

Analyze and interpret data on natural hazards to forecast future catastrophic events and inform the development of technologies to mitigate their effects.

More Stories in MS-ESS3-2

  1. Climate

    Student scientists work to help all of us survive a warmer world

    From glaciers in the refrigerator to a rover in the field, here’s how young scientists are looking to help us adapt to climate change.

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  2. Chemistry

    New solution for carbon dioxide: Turn it into ‘green’ fuel

    Chemists have created a new way to convert carbon dioxide into ethanol. It might one day help remove excess CO2 — a greenhouse gas — from the air.

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  3. Environment

    Australian wildfires pumped smoke to record heights

    Wildfires in Australia in late December and early January spurred an unusual smoke plume that still hasn’t fully dispersed.

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  4. Climate

    Climate change drove Australian wildfires to extremes

    Australia’s devastating 2019–2020 wildfires were at least 30 percent more likely because of human-caused climate change.

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  5. Environment

    Australian fires have imperiled up to 100 species

    As massive wildfires consume huge swaths of Australia’s bush, untold species — many of them found nowhere else — are now threatened with extinction.

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  6. Climate

    Explainer: What is attribution science?

    A relatively new, developing field of science investigates possible links between climate change and extreme weather events.

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  7. Physics

    Explainer: What is thundersnow?

    Wacky weather produced lots of thundersnow during New England’s recent winter storms. Some scientists now suspect Mother Nature got some human help.

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  8. Earth

    Ancient Arctic ‘gas’ melt triggered enormous seafloor explosions

    Methane explosions 12,000 years ago left huge craters in bedrock on the Arctic seafloor. Scientists worry more could be on the way today as Earth’s ice sheets melt.

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  9. Climate

    Predicting a wildfire with data from space

    When the West gets dry it can catch fire. A teen decided to find out if satellite data might show where a fire’s fuel might reside.

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