MS-ETS1-2

Evaluate competing design solutions using a systematic process to determine how well they meet the criteria and constraints of the problem.

More Stories in MS-ETS1-2

  1. Tech

    Robots made of cells blur the line between creature and machine

    Scientists are using living cells and tissue as building blocks to make robots. These new machines challenge ideas about robots and life itself.

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  2. Physics

    A new device uses atoms’ quantum weirdness to peer underground

    Quantum sensors like this one could monitor magma beneath volcanoes or uncover archaeological artifacts.

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  3. Materials Science

    A disinfectant made from sawdust knocks out deadly microbes

    It’s made by pressure-cooking sawdust and water, is cheap and easy to make — and could lead to greener cleaning products than chemicals used today.

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  4. Health & Medicine

    Sickle-cell gene therapies offer hope — and challenges

    Doctor Erica Esrick discusses existing treatments and an ongoing clinical trial for a gene therapy to treat sickle cell disease.

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  5. Tech

    Teen inventors say: There’s got to be a better way

    Finalists in the 2022 Regeneron Science Talent Search are revamping prostheses, earthquake safety systems and air travel.

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  6. Chemistry

    New process can transform urban CO2 pollution into a resource

    Researchers have developed a liquid metal that breaks down carbon dioxide in the air, converting it from a climate threat into a valuable raw material.

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  7. Genetics

    DNA in air can help ID unseen animals nearby

    Analyzing these genetic residues in air offers a new way to study animals. It could give scientists a chance to monitor rare or hard to find animals.

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  8. Environment

    Recycling a climate-warming gas could make ‘greener’ farmed fish

    Instead of warming the climate, methane gas can be collected to help farmers. Along the way, it may also save some fish.

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  9. Tech

    This crumb-sized camera uses artificial intelligence to get big results

    Researchers have developed a camera the size of a coarse grain of salt that takes amazingly clear photos.

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