MS-ETS1-3

Analyze data from tests to determine similarities and differences among several design solutions to identify the best characteristics of each that can be combined into a new solution to better meet the criteria for success.

More Stories in MS-ETS1-3

  1. Materials Science

    Bandages made from crab shells speed healing

    The chitin in seafood wastes, insect “bones” and fungi is a chemist’s dream. Used in a new medical dressing, it beats regular gauze for wound healing.

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  2. Health & Medicine

    Could a toothpaste help treat peanut allergy?

    By rolling an immune therapy into a toothbrushing routine, one company hopes to show its product can build and maintain tolerance to peanut allergens.

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  3. Animals

    Analyze This: Cows burp less methane after early-life treatment

    Calves that receive the 14-week treatment belch less of the greenhouse gas, possibly due to shifts in their gut microbes.

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  4. Plants

    Scientists may have finally found how catnip repels insects

    The plant deters mosquitoes and fruit flies by triggering a chemical receptor that, in some animals, senses pain and itch.

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  5. Math

    Explainer: What is statistics?

    Scientists use statistics to design studies, analyze data and evaluate uncertainty. You’ll find it in biology, climate change, medicine and more.

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  6. Computing

    Machine learning includes deep learning and neural nets

    By combining patterns found in mountains of data with information gleaned from mistakes, these computer programs expand their artificial intelligence.

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  7. Science & Society

    When COVID-19 comes for your science fair

    When labs shut down due to COVID-19, teens took their science fair projects to the internet and … sometimes even to the bathroom.

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  8. Health & Medicine

    Some young adults will volunteer to get COVID-19 for science

    Researchers will soon give some healthy people the new coronavirus. Their young volunteers have agreed to get sick to speed coronavirus research.

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  9. Math

    Scientists Say: Outlier

    Data points often fall within a normal range. When one data point sticks out a lot, it might be an outlier.

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