MS-LS2-1

Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence for the effects of resource availability on organisms and populations of organisms in an ecosystem.

More Stories in MS-LS2-1

  1. Science & Society

    For teens, big problems may lead to meaningful research

    Several teens who competed at the Regeneron Science Talent Search applied their STEM know-how to solve problems they or their communities faced.

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  2. Animals

    What you need to know about ‘murder hornets’

    Two new specimens of the world’s largest hornet have just turned up in the United States. Here’s what to make of them and other alien-hornet invaders.

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  3. Oceans

    Going bright may help corals recover from bleaching

    When some corals bleach, they turn neon colors. Flashy hues may be part of a response that helps these corals recover and reunite with their algae.

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  4. Animals

    When prey get scarce, these jellies become cannibals

    Invasive comb jellies may feast on their larvae if massive population booms in summer deplete their prey.

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  5. Science & Society

    Science isn’t just for scientists

    It doesn’t take an advanced degree or a lab to do science. All you need is curiosity and an interest in learning something new every day.

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  6. Health & Medicine

    The many challenges of corralling a coronavirus outbreak

    The Chinese government has quarantined millions of people in hopes of limiting spread of a new coronavirus. But no one yet knows how much this will help.

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  7. Ecosystems

    Newfound desert soil community lives on sips of fog

    Lichens and other fungi and algae team up to form a 'grit-crust' on the parched soil of Chile’s Atacama Desert. Those species slake their thirst with moisture from coastal fog.

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  8. Environment

    Australian fires have imperiled up to 100 species

    As massive wildfires consume huge swaths of Australia’s bush, untold species — many of them found nowhere else — are now threatened with extinction.

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  9. Brain

    Scientists’ brains shrank after a long stay in Antarctica

    The isolation of a long-term mission at an Antarctic research station shrunk part of crew members’ brains, a small study suggests.

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