MS-LS2-4

Construct an argument supported by empirical evidence that changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem affect populations.

More Stories in MS-LS2-4

  1. Plants

    Urban gardens create a buffet for bees

    City gardens provide a huge amount of nectar and pollen for pollinators, making them an essential conservation tool.

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  2. Moderna and Pfizer vaccines appear to cut coronavirus spread

    The vaccines are about 90 percent effective at blocking infection, which should cut spread of the virus. And at least one vaccine works well in teens.

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  3. Climate

    Changing climate now threatens northern lakes year round

    Lakes in northern climes are getting warmer, and that’s not good for people, plants or animals.

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  4. Microbes

    Some microbial hitchhikers may weaken body’s attack on COVID-19

    New research identifies an altered mix of microbes in the body — ones commonly seen in people with poor diets — that may worsen coronavirus disease.

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  5. Health & Medicine

    Some young adults will volunteer to get COVID-19 for science

    Researchers will soon give some healthy people the new coronavirus. Their young volunteers have agreed to get sick to speed coronavirus research.

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  6. Animals

    Choked by bacteria, some starfish are turning to goo

    For years, researchers thought gooey, dying starfish were infected. Instead, these sea stars are suffocating. And bacteria may be behind it all.

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  7. Environment

    Jumping ‘snake worms’ are invading U.S. forests

    These bad-news invaders are spreading across the United States. As they turn forest debris into bare ground, soils and ecosystems are changing.

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  8. Humans

    Changing climates can take cooling tips from warm regions

    When summer heat waves hit northern cities, people might look to keep cool using tropical building strategies — and forgotten architectural wisdom.

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  9. Health & Medicine

    Four summer camps show how to limit COVID-19 outbreak

    Schools might take a lesson from these overnight facilities in Maine. They kept infection rates low by testing a lot and grouping kids into ‘bubbles.’

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