MS-LS3-1

Develop and use a model to describe why structural changes to genes (mutations) located on chromosomes may affect proteins and may result in harmful, beneficial, or neutral effects to the structure and function of the organism.

More Stories in MS-LS3-1

  1. Animals

    Will the woolly mammoth return?

    Scientists are using genetic engineering and cloning to try to bring back extinct species or save endangered ones. Here’s how and why.

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  2. Archaeology

    A medieval grave may have held a powerful nonbinary person

    A 1,000-year-old grave in Finland, once thought to hold a respected woman warrior, may belong to someone who didn’t have a strictly male or female identity.

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  3. Microbes

    Explainer: Virus variants and strains

    When viruses become more infectious or better able to survive the body’s immune system, they become a type of variant known as a strain.

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  4. Health & Medicine

    One key change may have helped the coronavirus become a global menace

    One key mutation may have helped the virus behind COVID-19 better infect human cells.

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  5. Life

    These rabbits can’t hop. A gene defect makes them do handstands

    Mutations in a gene that helps nerve cells work properly rob rabbits of their ability to hop. Instead, the animals use their front paws to move.

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  6. Health & Medicine

    Bringing COVID-19 vaccines to much of world is hard

    The price of not vaccinating nearly everyone across the world could be a longer pandemic and more troubling variants of the new coronavirus.

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  7. Humans

    By not including everyone, genome science has blind spots

    Little diversity in genetic databases makes precision medicine hard for many. One historian proposes a solution, but some scientists doubt it’ll work.

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  8. Animals

    How do you build a centaur?

    A centaur has the torso of a human and the body of a horse. It may sound cool, but it wouldn’t work very well.

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  9. Space

    Space travel may harm health by damaging cells’ powerhouses

    Biochemical changes after going to space suggest that harm to cells’ energy-producing structures, called mitochondria, could explain astronauts’ health issues.

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