MS-LS3-1

Develop and use a model to describe why structural changes to genes (mutations) located on chromosomes may affect proteins and may result in harmful, beneficial, or neutral effects to the structure and function of the organism.

More Stories in MS-LS3-1

  1. Health & Medicine

    Bringing COVID-19 vaccines to much of world is hard

    The price of not vaccinating nearly everyone across the world could be a longer pandemic and more troubling variants of the new coronavirus.

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  2. Humans

    By not including everyone, genome science has blind spots

    Little diversity in genetic databases makes precision medicine hard for many. One historian proposes a solution, but some scientists doubt it’ll work.

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  3. Animals

    How do you build a centaur?

    A centaur has the torso of a human and the body of a horse. It may sound cool, but it wouldn’t work very well.

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  4. Space

    Space travel may harm health by damaging cells’ powerhouses

    Biochemical changes after going to space suggest that harm to cells’ energy-producing structures, called mitochondria, could explain astronauts’ health issues.

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  5. Humans

    Some identical twins don’t have the exact same DNA

    Identical twins may not be exactly identical. Mutations may arise early in development that account for tiny genetic differences between siblings.

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  6. Health & Medicine

    Early details emerge about the new U.K. coronavirus variant

    The variant may spread more easily from person to person. That could make continuing to wear masks all the more important, experts say.

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  7. Genetics

    Gene editing can alter body fat and may fight diabetes

    Researchers have long dreamed of using brown fat to fight obesity and diabetes. Work in animals shows they’re closing in on achieving that dream.

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  8. Space

    Surviving Mars missions will take planning and lots of innovation

    Astronauts that go to Mars will need protection from microgravity and radiation, plus mini-medical devices to diagnose problems and manage emergencies.

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  9. Chemistry

    2020 chemistry Nobel goes for CRISPR, the gene-editing tool

    Only eight years after its development, CRISPR has revolutionized genetics. It also just brought Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer Doudna acclaim.

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