MS-LS4-5

Gather and synthesize information about the technologies that have changed the way humans influence the inheritance of desired traits in organisms.

More Stories in MS-LS4-5

  1. Animals

    Cloning boosts endangered black-footed ferrets

    A cloned ferret named Elizabeth Ann brings genetic diversity to a species that nearly went extinct in the 1980s.

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  2. Life

    Even raised by people, wolves don’t tune into you like your dog

    Dog puppies outpace wolf pups at engaging with humans, even with less exposure to people, supporting the idea that domestication changed dogs’ brains.

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  3. Health & Medicine

    Bringing COVID-19 vaccines to much of world is hard

    The price of not vaccinating nearly everyone across the world could be a longer pandemic and more troubling variants of the new coronavirus.

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  4. Humans

    By not including everyone, genome science has blind spots

    Little diversity in genetic databases makes precision medicine hard for many. One historian proposes a solution, but some scientists doubt it’ll work.

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  5. Archaeology

    Harsh Ice Age winters may have helped turn wolves into dogs

    In the Ice Age, Arctic hunters may have turned to some game for their fatty bones. Much of those animals’ meat might have been left to domesticate dogs.

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  6. Plants

    Here’s how giant pumpkins get so big

    Cinderella took a ride in a pumpkin coach. Though real pumpkins do get big enough, here’s why their ride would be uncomfortable at best.

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  7. Genetics

    Gene editing can alter body fat and may fight diabetes

    Researchers have long dreamed of using brown fat to fight obesity and diabetes. Work in animals shows they’re closing in on achieving that dream.

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  8. Health & Medicine

    A glowing new way to measure antibodies

    Researchers invent a way to detect and measure antibodies with glowing proteins. Antibodies can mark exposure to various diseases.

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  9. Animals

    A single chemical may draw lonely locusts into a hungry swarm

    Swarms of locusts can destroy crops. Scientists have discovered a chemical that might make locusts come together in huge hungry swarms.

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