MS-LS4-6

Use mathematical representations to support explanations of how natural selection may lead to increases and decreases of specific traits in populations over time.

More Stories in MS-LS4-6

  1. Animals

    A new drug mix helps frogs regrow amputated legs

    The treatment helped frogs grow working limbs useful for swimming, standing and kicking. It’ll be a while before people can do that.

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  2. Animals

    See the world through a jumping spider’s eyes — and other senses

    Scientists are teasing out the many ways the spiders’ vision, listening and taste senses differ from ours

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  3. Animals

    Mysterious kunga is the oldest known human-bred hybrid animal

    People bred these animals — part donkey, part wild ass — some 4,500 years ago, probably for use in fighting wars.

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  4. Life

    Scientists Say: Adaptation

    This word refers to a feature of a living thing that helps it better survive in its environment — or the process of that feature evolving in a population.

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  5. Animals

    Cloning boosts endangered black-footed ferrets

    A cloned ferret named Elizabeth Ann brings genetic diversity to a species that nearly went extinct in the 1980s.

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  6. Microbes

    Explainer: Virus variants and strains

    When viruses become more infectious or better able to survive the body’s immune system, they become a type of variant known as a strain.

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  7. Genetics

    Just a tiny share of the DNA in us is unique to humans

    Some of these tweaks to DNA, however, may have played a role in brain evolution.

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  8. Life

    Even raised by people, wolves don’t tune into you like your dog

    Dog puppies outpace wolf pups at engaging with humans, even with less exposure to people, supporting the idea that domestication changed dogs’ brains.

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  9. Fossils

    Dinosaur families appear to have lived in the Arctic year-round

    Fossils of baby dinosaurs in northern Alaska challenge the idea that northern dinosaurs only spent their summers in the high Arctic.

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