MS-PS1-1

Develop models to describe the atomic composition of simple molecules and extended structures.

More Stories in MS-PS1-1

  1. Tech

    Here’s one way to harvest water right out of the air

    Need water but you have no access to rain, lakes or groundwater? Materials known as metal-organic frameworks could be used to slurp that water from the air, new data show.

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  2. Chemistry

    Batteries should not burst into flames

    Because lithium-ion batteries power modern life, they need to store a lot of energy. Now scientists are focusing on making them safer.

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  3. Chemistry

    Converting trash to valuable graphene in a flash

    Flash heating of carbon-rich wastes creates graphene, which has many commercial uses.

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  4. Materials Science

    New twist can hush — even cloak — some sounds

    Swiss engineers developed clear, spiral structures to make a new sound-dampening system. Those twists block some vibrations and lets others through.

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  5. Physics

    Like Magneto? Microcrystals give magnets superpower over living cells

    New iron-rich protein crystals could help researchers better understand the nerve cells that control movement and sensation. All they need are magnets.

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  6. Chemistry

    Chemistry’s ever-useful periodic table celebrates a big birthday

    2019 is the International Year of the Periodic Table. But the traditional chart is just one of many shapes that chemists and other scientists have developed to organize the elements.

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  7. Chemistry

    Explainer: What are acids and bases?

    These chemistry terms tell us if a molecule is more likely to give up a proton or pick up a new one.

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  8. Climate

    Explainer: The making of a snowflake

    Have you ever wondered how a snowflake gets its shape?

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  9. Earth

    Explainer: Why sea levels aren’t rising at the same rate globally

    The ocean is rising all over the world. The rise seems speedier in some places. What gives? Many factors, it turns out, affect where — and why — the tide gets high.

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