Animals

  1. Fossils

    Tube-dwelling sea creatures may be oldest known parasites

    A fossil bed of clam-like animals from a half-billion years ago is covered in tube-dwelling organisms. These suggest the tube dwellers were parasites, scientists now report.

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  2. Animals

    Bumblebees may bite leaves to spur plant blooming

    In a pollen shortage, some bees nick holes in tomato leaves. This can speed up flowering and pollen production by weeks.

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  3. Animals

    Let’s learn about bioluminescence

    Some animals, bacteria and algae produce their own light. This bioluminescence can attract mates or protect from predators.

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  4. Oceans

    Going bright may help corals recover from bleaching

    When some corals bleach, they turn neon colors. Flashy hues may be part of a response that helps these corals recover and reunite with their algae.

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  5. Animals

    Toxic germs on its skin make this newt deadly

    Bacteria living on the skin of some rough-skinned newts make tetrodotoxin. This paralyzing poison is also found in pufferfish.

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  6. Life

    Why you’re spotting more wildlife during COVID-19

    People are seeing more animals than they did before the pandemic. There are many reasons why.

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  7. Chemistry

    This tube worm’s glowing slime may help sustain its own shine

    Snot oozed by a marine tube worm can glow for up to 3 full days. The secret of how this works might lead to long-lasting lights that glow on and on.

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  8. Science & Society

    #BlackBirdersWeek seeks to open the outdoors for everyone

    The social media campaign #BlackBirdersWeek hopes to show the world the many black birders and nature lovers of color.

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  9. Animals

    Why elephants and armadillos might easily get drunk

    Stories of drunken elephants may not be a myth. Differences in a gene for breaking down alcohol could explain how they get tipsy.

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  10. Animals

    When prey get scarce, these jellies become cannibals

    Invasive comb jellies may feast on their larvae if massive population booms in summer deplete their prey.

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  11. Animals

    Traces from nuclear-weapons tests offer clues to whale sharks’ ages

    Traces left by nuclear-bomb testing in the 1950s and ‘60s can help researchers learn how old a whale shark is.

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  12. Animals

    Let’s learn about domestic cats

    Cats rule the internet — and many of our homes. To get here was a journey of many thousands of years.

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