Archaeology

  1. Archaeology

    European fossils may belong to earliest known hominid

    New fossils suggest that the earliest non-ape human ancestors may have evolved in Europe, not Africa.

    By
  2. Archaeology

    America’s first settlers may have arrived 130,000 years ago

    An archaeological site where mastodon remains were found suggests that the first Americans may have arrived unexpectedly early.

    By
  3. Archaeology

    This hominid may have shared Earth with humans

    Newfound fossils in South Africa point to a far more recent age for Homo naledi than had been accepted. If correct, this hominid might have coexisted with humans — even interacted with our species.

    By
  4. Archaeology

    Stone Age dentists treated cavities with tar

    Is Italy the home of dentistry? That’s where treated tooth decay has been found, dating back 14 millennia. Cavities appear picked clean with sharp tools. Ouch!

    By
  5. Archaeology

    Fossils point to Neandertal diets — and medicine use

    Whether Neandertals were largely meat-eaters or vegans depended on their environment, fossils now suggest. Their teeth also indicate they used natural medicines.

    By
  6. Archaeology

    Silk Road’s origins may date back millennia

    The mountain treks of ancient herders helped mold a cross-continent trade network known as the Silk Road.

    By
  7. Archaeology

    Space archaeologists need your help to protect ancient treasures

    Explorers who search for ancient ruins in satellite images are asking for help from the public. Volunteers can visit a new website to sign up.

    By
  8. Archaeology

    Cool Jobs: Hunting surprises in thinning glaciers

    Meet three scientists who are tracking the meltdown of Earth’s glaciers. They share their adventures, predictions and unexpected discoveries.

    By
  9. Archaeology

    ‘Cousin’ Lucy may have fallen from a tree to her death 3.2 million years ago

    A contested study suggests that Lucy, a famous fossil ancestor of humans, fell from a tree to her death.

    By
  10. Archaeology

    The first farmers were two groups, not one

    The humans that began farming 10,000 years ago in the Fertile Crescent may have been two cultures living side-by-side.

    By
  11. Archaeology

    Neandertals: Ancient Stone Age builders had tech skills

    Neandertals built stalagmite circles in a French cave 176,500 years ago. These structures show that these ancient human cousins had social and technical skills.

    By
  12. Archaeology

    Hunter-gatherers roamed Florida 14,500 years ago

    Tools and bones from a submerged site in Florida show that Stone Age people lived in North America earlier than was once thought.

    By