Chemistry

  1. Materials Science

    Reversible superglue mimics snail slime

    Inspired by snail slime, scientists have created the first super-strong adhesive that can be easily become unstuck, when necessary.

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  2. Chemistry

    Scientists Say: Periodic table

    The periodic table is a chart showing all the known chemical elements. An element’s location in the table reveals a lot about its chemistry.

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  3. Chemistry

    Cool Job: One green chemist is mining zoo dung for biological helpers

    Her goal is to convert farm-field wastes into useful fuels and chemicals

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  4. Chemistry

    2019 Nobel Prize in chemistry goes for pioneering lithium-ion batteries

    Today’s lithium-ion batteries power everything from smartphones to computers. Three scientists who pioneered those batteries just got the 2019 Nobel Prize in chemistry.

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  5. Physics

    Scientists find the secret to colossal bubbles

    What’s the right mix of materials to blow big bubbles that stretch without popping? Physicists have turned up the solution.

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  6. Chemistry

    Chemists have created a ring-shaped form of carbon

    A ring-shaped carbon molecule takes its place among buckyballs, carbon nanotubes and other odd forms of the element.

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  7. Chemistry

    Scientists Say: pH

    pH is a scale used to measure the acidity or alkalinity of a solution. The scale ranges from zero to 14, with seven as the perfect neutral middle.

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  8. Chemistry

    Explainer: The bacteria behind your B.O.

    Special glands in our armpits give us our signature stink. But it’s not our sweat that’s to blame. It’s the bacteria that gobble it up.

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  9. Tech

    A new electric surgery tool may someday fix nose, ear and eye problems

    A new surgery tool uses electricity to reshape ear and nose tissue in minutes, without pain. Someday, it might even work on eyes to restore normal vision.

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  10. Physics

    Tiny new magnets are not only squishy but also liquid

    Researchers have just created liquid droplets that behave like tiny bar magnets. The movement of these external magnets might help control robots and more.

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  11. Chemistry

    Fireworks shower the skies with science

    Filling the night sky with fireworks requires the help of chemists, electrical engineers and people who can choreograph theatrical shows.

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  12. Microbes

    Slimy fish could aid the search for new drugs

    Fish slime could teach scientists about bacteria that live on fish and aid in the hunt for new kinds of antibiotics.

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