Environment

  1. Climate

    Student scientists work to help all of us survive a warmer world

    From glaciers in the refrigerator to a rover in the field, here’s how young scientists are looking to help us adapt to climate change.

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  2. Environment

    Washing your jeans too much might pose risks to the environment

    Jeans shed thousands of denim fibers in every wash. Those fibers, and the chemicals used to treat them, now are showing up in even the Arctic Ocean.

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  3. Ecosystems

    Scientists Say: Desert

    Deserts are ecosystems that get less than 250 millimeters (10 inches) of precipitation per year.

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  4. Chemistry

    How to recycle ‘nonrecyclable’ plastics

    A new process can convert some nonrecyclable plastics into a type that now can be reused. That could greatly cut down on wastes sent to landfills.

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  5. Environment

    Analyze This: Perfumes from everyday products collect in distant ice

    Common scent-bearing chemicals are trapped in ice cored from Europe’s tallest peak. Dig into the data to find a story behind that pollution.

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  6. Animals

    Whale blowholes don’t keep out seawater

    Whales’ blowholes aren’t as protective as scientists had thought. They not only can let in water but also pollutants.

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  7. Chemistry

    New solution for carbon dioxide: Turn it into ‘green’ fuel

    Chemists have created a new way to convert carbon dioxide into ethanol. It might one day help remove excess CO2 — a greenhouse gas — from the air.

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  8. Animals

    A single chemical may draw lonely locusts into a hungry swarm

    Swarms of locusts can destroy crops. Scientists have discovered a chemical that might make locusts come together in huge hungry swarms.

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  9. Environment

    Busy beavers may be speeding thaw of Arctic permafrost

    As climate change continues, busy beavers are expanding their range in Alaska. Their dams could further speed the loss of permafrost there and promote local warming.

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  10. Health & Medicine

    Dust can infect animals with flu, raising coronavirus concerns

    Dust particles kicked up from some virus-contaminated surface can become a source of new infections, rodent data show.

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  11. Space

    Scientists Say: Solar

    What do solar energy, the solar year and solar flares have in common? They’re all related to the sun.

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  12. Environment

    Pesticides contaminate most food of western U.S. monarchs

    Monarch caterpillars eat only milkweeds. A new study finds widespread pesticide use has tainted these plants across the insect’s western U.S. breeding grounds.

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