All Stories

  1. Health & Medicine

    Common drug, dexamethasone, appears first to cut COVID-19 deaths

    A drug used for decades to treat inflammation now appears useful in saving the lives of severely ill COVID-19 patients — ones who have trouble breathing.

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  2. Deadly heat: Expected by century’s end, it’s here already

    Instances of hot and humid conditions that threaten human lives are on the rise.

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  3. Plants

    Silk-based microneedles may help treat diseased plants

    Engineers have invented silk microneedles to inject medicines into plants. One day farmers might use drones to dart their sick plants with meds from the air.

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  4. Environment

    Let’s learn about rain

    People need rain for their crops and their drinking fountains. But there sometimes can be too much of a good thing.

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  5. Space

    Astronauts may be able to make cement with their own pee

    Lunar dust and a compound found in urine might one day be used to build future dwellings on the moon, a new study finds.

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  6. Tech

    Waiting for a ‘smart’ toilet? It’s nearly here

    With every bathroom visit, we flush away important health data. Scientists hope to change that with 'smart toilets' that analyze your body’s output.

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  7. Oceans

    Scientists Say: Tsunami

    This is a series of ocean waves triggered by an underwater earthquake or volcano. The event starts as small waves, but those waves can grow as they approach land.

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  8. Archaeology

    This cave hosted the oldest known human remains in Europe

    Bone fragments, tools and other finds in Bulgaria suggest that Homo sapiens moved rapidly into Eurasia as early as 46,000 years ago.

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  9. Science & Society

    Coronavirus lockdowns may have avoided 531 million infections

    Studies find big benefits from global coronavirus lockdowns. More than a half a billion of the potentially deadly infections appear to have been avoided.

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  10. Fossils

    Saber-toothed anchovy relatives were once fearsome hunters

    Today’s plankton-eating anchovies sport tiny teeth. But their ancient kin were armed with spiky lower teeth and a giant upper sabertooth.

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