Alison Pearce Stevens

Freelance Writer

Alison Pearce Stevens is a former duck wrangler, beekeeper and forever science geek who specializes in writing about science and nature for kids. She lives in the Midwest with her husband, their two kids and a small menagerie of cuddly (and not-so cuddly) critters. She writes for Science News for Students, Highlights, ASK (Arts and Sciences for Kids) magazine and National Geographic Kids' Books. Her next book, Uncovering Ashfall, comes out in 2021. She is also an avid gardener who can often be found in her yard, checking out the critters that call it home.

All Stories by Alison Pearce Stevens

  1. Psychology

    Can’t remember? Maybe you multitask too much between screens

    Splitting your attention between devices can make it hard to create new memories, even when you’re not multitasking.

  2. Health & Medicine

    Social distancing for teens shouldn’t mean giving up your social life

    During even partial lockdowns, keeping connected with friends makes all the difference. That’s what athletes and other teen groups are finding.

  3. Animals

    Around the world, birds are in crisis

    Human activities around the world are threatening bird species. Numbers of even some of the most common species are starting to fall.

  4. Environment

    Polluting microplastics harm both animals and ecosystems

    Researchers are beginning to uncover the real-world impacts of polluting microplastic bits on animals and the ecosystems they inhabit.

  5. Plants

    The faster trees grow, the younger they die

    As climate change spurs forest tree growth, it also shortens trees’ lives. That results in a quicker release of climate-warming carbon back into the atmosphere.

  6. Ecosystems

    Soggy coastal soils? Here’s why ecologists love them

    Coastal wetlands can protect our shores from erosion, flooding and rising sea levels.

  7. Chemistry

    Stinky success: Scientists identify the chemistry of B.O.

    They turned up the enzyme in bacteria behind that underarm stench. Understanding how it works could pave the way to new types of deodorant.

  8. Materials Science

    Will bacterial ‘wires’ one day power your phone?

    An accidental discovery helps scientists generate electricity out of thin —but humid — air with bacteria-made protein nanowires.

  9. Environment

    Pesticides can have long-term impact on bumblebee learning

    Pesticide-laced nectar and pollen can permanently harm the brains of baby bumblebees.

  10. Brain

    Sleep helps teens cope with discrimination

    Good sleep helps teens better deal with racial and ethnic discrimination.

  11. Health & Medicine

    New ultrasound treatment kills off cancer cells

    Low-frequency ultrasound destroys cancer cells while leaving most healthy cells intact.

  12. Animals

    Conservation is going to the dogs

    Scientists are now training dogs to help track rare, elusive — and sometimes invasive — plants and animals.