Alison Pearce Stevens

Freelance Writer

Alison Pearce Stevens is a former duck wrangler, beekeeper and forever science geek who specializes in writing about science and nature for kids. She lives in the Midwest with her husband, their two kids and a small menagerie of cuddly (and not-so cuddly) critters. She writes for Science News for Students, Highlights, ASK (Arts and Sciences for Kids) magazine and National Geographic Kids' Books. Her next book, Rhinos in Nebraska, comes out in 2021. She is also an avid gardener who can often be found in her yard, checking out the critters that call it home.

All Stories by Alison Pearce Stevens

  1. Environment

    Everyday plastics can pollute, leaching thousands of chemicals

    Plastic bags and containers leach potentially toxic chemicals into both food and water, but researchers yet don’t know how they might affect health.

  2. Health & Medicine

    A single vape session can harm immune cells in the body

    Vaping creates molecules in the body that can attack cells and cause damage.

  3. Health & Medicine

    Starting schools later leads to less tardiness, fewer ‘zombies’

    Students attending schools with later start times feel more awake during the day and are less likely to oversleep and be late for class.

  4. Animals

    Tiny animals survive 24,000 years in suspended animation

    Tiny bdelloid rotifers awake from a 24,000-year slumber when freed from the Arctic permafrost.

  5. Animals

    Abdominal fuzz makes bee bodies super slippery

    Scientists find that tiny hairs on a honeybee’s abdomen reduce wear and tear as a bee’s outer skeletal parts rub against each other all day long.

  6. Fossils

    Rhinos, camels and bone-crushing dogs once roamed Nebraska

    Scientists digging into the remnants of an ancient watering hole in Nebraska discovered evidence of an Africa-like savanna, complete with rhinos.

  7. Brain

    Patterns in brain activity can identify who will struggle to read

    Certain patterns of brain activity predict whether teens are strong readers or will struggle. Those diagnostic patterns show up even when doing math.

  8. Plants

    Urban gardens create a buffet for bees

    City gardens provide a huge amount of nectar and pollen for pollinators, making them an essential conservation tool.

  9. Brain

    Teen depression linked to how the brain processes rewards

    Depression in teens alters their brains’ pathways in ways that may put those kids at risk of lifelong mental-health problems — unless they get help.

  10. Physics

    Butterflies use jet propulsion for quick getaways

    If you have ever tried to catch a resting butterfly, you know they are surprisingly difficult to nab. A new study helps explain why.

  11. Brain

    Study is first to link brainwaves to certain forms of thought

    Electrical activity in the brain reveals when we are focused or allowing our minds to wander freely.

  12. Psychology

    Can’t remember? Maybe you multitask too much between screens

    Splitting your attention between devices can make it hard to create new memories, even when you’re not multitasking.