Bethany Brookshire

Staff Writer, Science News for Students

Bethany Brookshire has a B.S. in biology and a B.A. in philosophy from The College of William and Mary, and a Ph.D. in physiology and pharmacology from Wake Forest University School of Medicine. She was a 2019-2020 Knight Science Journalism Fellow at MIT, the winner of the Society for Neuroscience Next Generation Award and the Three Quarks Daily Science Writing Award, among others. She writes news and features and several series, including Technically Fiction, Scientists Say and Experiments.

All Stories by Bethany Brookshire

  1. Animals

    To figure out your dog’s ‘real’ age, you’ll need a calculator

    What’s your dog’s human-equivalent age? Just multiply how old it is times seven, right? Uh, no. And here’s why.

  2. Explainer: What are logarithms and exponents?

    Mathematics provides a means of tracking, comparing and expressing data that vary broadly in scale.

  3. Archaeology

    Scientists Say: Archaeology

    People leave things where they’ve been — old buildings, trash heaps and human skeletons. Archaeology is the study of those left-behind things.

  4. Earth

    Let’s learn about volcanoes

    Volcanoes bring melted rock up to a planet’s surface.

  5. Ecosystems

    Scientists Say: Deforestation

    Trees slurp up carbon dioxide and help keep our planet cool. But deforestation cuts those trees down in large numbers.

  6. Planets

    Let’s learn about exoplanets

    Exoplanets are planets outside of our solar system. Scientists are finding out more about them than ever before.

  7. Physics

    Scientists Say: Microgravity

    Gravity is a force that brings objects together. But when those objects get far away, the force feels small. It feels like microgravity.

  8. Health & Medicine

    Can we taste fat? The brain thinks so

    Scientists had not considered fat a 'taste.' The brain begs to differ, new data show.

  9. Ecosystems

    Let’s learn about coral reefs

    Coral reefs are home to many important species. But climate change is stressing corals to the max.

  10. Chemistry

    Scientists Say: Atom

    An atom is the smallest possible piece of a chemical element.