Carolyn Gramling

Earth & Climate Writer, Science News

Carolyn is the Earth & Climate writer at Science News. Previously she worked at Science magazine for six years, both as a reporter covering paleontology and polar science and as the editor of the news in brief section. Before that she was a reporter and editor at EARTH magazine. She has bachelor’s degrees in Geology and European History and a Ph.D. in marine geochemistry from MIT and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. She’s also a former Science News intern.

All Stories by Carolyn Gramling

  1. Animals

    Attack of the inner-cannibal mega-shark

    The outsized megalodon was a fierce terror that chewed its way across the oceans. It learned to kill even before it was born.

  2. Microbes

    Some deep-seafloor microbes still alive after 100 million years!

    Some starving microbes nap while awaiting their next meal. For some living miles below the ocean surface, that nap may exceed 100 million years.

  3. Climate

    Siberian heat wave that caused an oil spill made more likely by climate change

    The six-month heat wave in Siberia during the first half of 2020 would not have happened without human-caused climate change, researchers find.

  4. Fossils

    These crocodile ancestors lived a two-legged life

    A set of 106-million year old footprints show a crocodile relative appears to have walked on two legs.

  5. Earth

    Lightning megaflashes set big new distance and duration records

    Scans of satellite images identified two lightning bolts with previously unheard-of dimensions. Both flashed through the skies over South America.

  6. Environment

    Fossil fuels appear to release far more methane than we thought

    Ice cores reveal less methane than expected. This suggests today’s fossil fuel industry is responsible for nearly all of the methane emissions from natural sources today.

  7. Science & Society

    CO2 emissions have nosedived as COVID-19 keeps people home

    The COVID-19 pandemic restricted travel that can pollute the air. By April, travel-related daily emissions of greenhouse gases was back to 2006 levels.

  8. Earth

    A rainforest once grew near the South Pole

    A forest flourished within 1,000 kilometers of the South Pole. That was a while ago, as in millions of years ago.

  9. Climate

    Climate change drove Australian wildfires to extremes

    Australia’s devastating 2019–2020 wildfires were at least 30 percent more likely because of human-caused climate change.

  10. Fossils

    This dinosaur was no bigger than a hummingbird

    The skull of one of these ancient birds — the tiniest yet known — was discovered encased in a chunk of amber originally found in Myanmar.

  11. Earth

    Study appears to rule out volcanic burps as causing dino die-offs

    New data on when massive volcanic eruptions happened do not match when the dinosaur mass extinction took place.

  12. Animals

    Blood vessels in their heads kept big dinos from overheating

    Giant dinosaurs evolved several ways to cool their blood and avoid heatstroke.