Douglas Fox

Freelance Writer

Douglas Fox is a freelance journalist who writes about life, earth and Antarctic sciences. His stories have appeared in Scientific American, National Geographic, Esquire, Virginia Quarterly Review, High Country News, Discover, Nature and The Best American Science and Nature Writing. His stories have garnered awards from the American Society of Journalists and Authors (2011), the National Association of Science Writers (2013), the American Geophysical Union (2015 and 2018) and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (2009 and 2017). Doug is a contributing author to The Science Writers’ Handbook (Da Capo, 2013).

All Stories by Douglas Fox

  1. Microbes

    Mystery microbes of the sea

    Biologists find archaea a true curiosity. They make up one of life’s three main branches. The two better known branches are bacteria and eukaryotes (u KARE ee oatz). That last branch includes animals, plants and fungi. But archaea have remained mysterious. Very little is known about them. In fact, their unique status wasn’t even recognized until relatively recently, in 1977.

  2. Animals

    Mud worth more than gold

    Reed Scherer and Ross Powell have studied mud from all over the world. It is different in each place. Mud from the Sulu Sea near Borneo is as smooth as cream cheese. Mud from Chesapeake Bay, in the mid-Atlantic United States, clings to your skin like peanut butter.

  3. Earth

    Explainer: Ice sheets and glaciers

    Ice sheets and glaciers give scientists clues about climate change.

  4. Earth

    Explainer: Antarctica, land of lakes

  5. Animals

    Animals under Antarctic ice?

  6. Climate

    The high life

  7. Climate

    Watching our seas rise

  8. Earth

    The oldest place on Earth

  9. Earth

    A ghost lake

  10. Earth

    Big rocks’ balancing acts