Lisa Grossman

Astronomy Writer, Science News

Lisa Grossman is the astronomy writer for Science News. Previously she was a news editor at New Scientist, where she ran the physical sciences section of the magazine for three years. Before that, she spent three years at New Scientist as a reporter, covering space, physics and astronomy. She has a degree in astronomy from Cornell University and a graduate certificate in science writing from UC Santa Cruz. Lisa was a finalist for the AGU David Perlman Award for Excellence in Science Journalism, and received the Institute of Physics/Science and Technology Facilities Council physics writing award and the AAS Solar Physics Division Popular Writing Award. She interned at Science News in 2009-2010.

All Stories by Lisa Grossman

  1. Close-up of the sun reveals ‘campfires’

    Solar Orbiter’s first images are in. The spacecraft’s pics show tiny, never-before-seen flares across the sun’s surface.

  2. Space

    A weird cousin of our solar system is caught on camera

    New photo reveals a cousin to our solar system. It’s star has a mass similar to the sun’s and is orbited by two gas giant planets.

  3. Planets

    Saturn’s moon Titan may host lots of dried lakes

    Suspicious spots around the moon’s middle could be the beds of ancient lakes. If so, this might solve a 20-year-old mystery.

  4. Space

    Developing planet emerges in a swirl of gas

    Images of a young star 520 light-years away show a spiral of gas and dust swirling around it. A twist inside the spiral appears to be a planet forming.

  5. Space

    Oldest disk galaxy puts a new spin on galaxy growth

    A spinning disk galaxy has been found in the early universe. Its existence is a surprise.

  6. Space

    Astronauts may be able to make cement with their own pee

    Lunar dust and a compound found in urine might one day be used to build future dwellings on the moon, a new study finds.

  7. Space

    A first: Commercial rocket takes humans into space

    Two NASA astronauts aboard the privately built Crew Dragon capsule are the first to be sent into orbit from U.S. soil since 2011.

  8. Planets

    Planets with hydrogen skies could harbor life

    Microbes can live in a hydrogen atmosphere. This points to new space worlds that host alien life.

  9. A seventh grader named NASA’s newest Mars rover

    NASA’s next Mars rover will be called Perseverance.

  10. Space

    Rover finds ‘layer cake’ below ground on moon’s farside

    China’s rover finds the moon’s farside is more rugged and cratered than the nearside. Now scientists want to know why.