Maria Temming

Staff Writer, Physical Sciences, Science News

Maria Temming is the staff writer for physical sciences at Science News. Maria has undergraduate degrees in physics and English from Elon University and a master's degree in science writing from MIT. She has written for Scientific AmericanSky & Telescope and NOVA Next. She’s also a former Science News intern.

All Stories by Maria Temming

  1. Animals

    Traces from nuclear-weapons tests offer clues to whale sharks’ ages

    Traces left by nuclear-bomb testing in the 1950s and ‘60s can help researchers learn how old a whale shark is.

  2. Environment

    Legos could last a disturbingly long time in the ocean

    By looking at toys washed up on beaches, scientists have estimated how long it takes hard plastics to break down in the oceans. And it’s a long time.

  3. Earth

    Newfound ‘dunes’ is among weirdest of northern lights

    There’s a new aurora dubbed the 'dunes.' It’s weird and joins the ranks of black auroras, STEVE and other odd natural light shows.

  4. Archaeology

    3-D printing helps resurrect an ancient Egyptian mummy’s voice

    A 3-D printed mold of a mummy’s vocal tract reveals what the mummy may sound like today.

  5. Earth

    Help for a world drowning in microplastics

    Microplastic pollution in our oceans and lakes is a problem. Scientists are testing solutions — from more biodegradable recipes to nanotechnology.

  6. Physics

    First heavy element identified from a neutron-star collision

    Scientists have at last witnessed newborn strontium in the afterglow of a neutron-star smashup. It confirms what they had suspected about how many massive stars are created.

  7. Planets

    Astronomers spot new type of storm on Saturn

    These storms are bigger and longer lasting than squalls but not nearly as massive as this planet's Great White Spots.

  8. Tech

    This device uses the cold night sky to generate electricity

    A new device uses the temperature difference between Earth and outer space to create electricity after dark. Powering a lamp, it would be the ultimate night light.

  9. Chemistry

    2019 Nobel Prize in chemistry goes for pioneering lithium-ion batteries

    Today’s lithium-ion batteries power everything from smartphones to computers. Three scientists who pioneered those batteries just got the 2019 Nobel Prize in chemistry.

  10. Climate

    Report sums up climate’s already dramatic impact on oceans and ice

    Melting glaciers, stronger storms and acidifying oceans are signs of climate change today, a new IPCC report says. Putting a brake on greenhouse emissions could limit how dire things get.