Maria Temming

Staff Writer, Physical Sciences, Science News

Maria Temming is the staff writer for physical sciences at Science News. Maria has undergraduate degrees in physics and English from Elon University and a master's degree in science writing from MIT. She has written for Scientific AmericanSky & Telescope and NOVA Next. She’s also a former Science News intern.

All Stories by Maria Temming

  1. Physics

    First heavy element identified from a neutron-star collision

    Scientists have at last witnessed newborn strontium in the afterglow of a neutron-star smashup. It confirms what they had suspected about how many massive stars are created.

  2. Planets

    Astronomers spot new type of storm on Saturn

    These storms are bigger and longer lasting than squalls but not nearly as massive as this planet's Great White Spots.

  3. Tech

    This device uses the cold night sky to generate electricity

    A new device uses the temperature difference between Earth and outer space to create electricity after dark. Powering a lamp, it would be the ultimate night light.

  4. Chemistry

    2019 Nobel Prize in chemistry goes for pioneering lithium-ion batteries

    Today’s lithium-ion batteries power everything from smartphones to computers. Three scientists who pioneered those batteries just got the 2019 Nobel Prize in chemistry.

  5. Climate

    Report sums up climate’s already dramatic impact on oceans and ice

    Melting glaciers, stronger storms and acidifying oceans are signs of climate change today, a new IPCC report says. Putting a brake on greenhouse emissions could limit how dire things get.

  6. Space

    Learning from what Apollo astronauts left on the moon

    In the 1960s and ’70s, Apollo astronauts left trash, mementos and science experiments on the moon. Researchers want to study and preserve the relics.

  7. Planets

    Preserving remnants of human culture on the moon

    Artifacts left behind by lunar landings have value to research and human history. Scientists now want to preserve those cast-offs while also learning from them.

  8. Computing

    Computer chips from carbon nanotubes, not silicon, mark a milestone

    Silicon has been king of cutting-edge electronics. But that reign may soon end, with carbon nanotubes taking silicon’s place.

  9. Tech

    AI can learn real-world skills by playing video games

    Video games are helping AI systems work together and adapt to real-world situations.

  10. Physics

    Tiny new magnets are not only squishy but also liquid

    Researchers have just created liquid droplets that behave like tiny bar magnets. The movement of these external magnets might help control robots and more.