Sid Perkins

Freelance Writer

Sid is a freelance science journalist. He lives in Crossville, Tenn., with his wife, two dogs and three cats. He specializes in earth sciences and paleontology but often tackles topics such as astronomy, planetary science, materials science and engineering. 

 

In 2009, Sid won the Award for Distinguished Science Journalism in the Atmospheric and Related Sciences from the American Meteorological Society. And in 2002, he shared the American Astronomical Society’s Solar Physics Division’s Award for Popular Writing on Solar Physics. Sid’s writing also appears in Science, Nature, Scientific American, the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and Science News.

All Stories by Sid Perkins

  1. Animals

    Common parasite may help mussels survive heat waves

    By whitening shells, the organism helps the shellfish stay cool on sunny days, a new study suggests.

  2. Climate

    Climate may have sent drift of the North Pole toward Greenland

    This mid-1990s shift in the pole’s movement was driven by glacial melt. And that was triggered in part by climate change, a new study reports.

  3. Animals

    The secret to T. rex‘s incredible biting force is at last revealed

    The force of a T. rex bite was roughly 6 metric tons. A new study points to what’s behind that mighty force.

  4. Animals

    Explainer: What are cicadas?

    There are more than 3,000 species of cicadas, but the best known in North America are periodical cicadas, which emerge every 13 or 17 years.

  5. Materials Science

    Copper ‘foam’ could be used as filters for COVID-19 masks

    The lightweight new material could serve as a washable and recyclable, eco-friendly alternative for many current mask filters.

  6. Planets

    Scientists discover likely source of the moon’s faint yellow tail

    These sodium atoms are part of the debris kicked up from the moon’s surface, mostly by micrometeorites, two new studies conclude.

  7. Environment

    COVID-19 cut pollution in 2020, warming the atmosphere

    Pandemic-related lockdowns briefly warmed the planet. The reason: The cleaner air carried fewer planet-cooling aerosols.

  8. Tech

    New ‘ionic wind’ can dry foods while preserving nutrients

    Researchers have come up with a way to increase the energy efficiency of a drying technique, possibly making it ready for prime time.

  9. Physics

    What did you say? Fabric masks can really muffle voices

    Some types of face masks muffle speech more than others — something that teachers should take into account.

  10. Environment

    Surprising long-haul dust and tar are melting high glaciers

    Dust and tar blown onto high mountains, like the Himalayas, boost the melting of snow and ice far more than scientists had realized. Here’s why.

  11. Tech

    ‘Frozen smoke’ could protect electronics from annoying static

    A fluffy material made from cellulose nanofibers and silver nanowires can protect electronic devices by blocking more than 99.99 percent of disrupting interference, a new study reveals.

  12. Health & Medicine

    A glowing new way to measure antibodies

    Researchers invent a way to detect and measure antibodies with glowing proteins. Antibodies can mark exposure to various diseases.