Sid Perkins

Freelance Writer

Sid is a freelance science journalist. He lives in Crossville, Tenn., with his wife, two dogs and three cats. He specializes in earth sciences and paleontology but often tackles topics such as astronomy, planetary science, materials science and engineering. 

 

In 2009, Sid won the Award for Distinguished Science Journalism in the Atmospheric and Related Sciences from the American Meteorological Society. And in 2002, he shared the American Astronomical Society’s Solar Physics Division’s Award for Popular Writing on Solar Physics. Sid’s writing also appears in Science, Nature, Scientific American, the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and Science News.

All Stories by Sid Perkins

  1. Tech

    Here’s one way to harvest water right out of the air

    Need water but you have no access to rain, lakes or groundwater? Materials known as metal-organic frameworks could be used to slurp that water from the air, new data show.

  2. Materials Science

    Silk can be molded into strong medical implants

    Freeze-dried and powdered silk has a long shelf life. It also is cheap to ship and can be molded into sturdy medical implants.

  3. Fossils

    Small T. rex ‘cousins’ may actually have been growing teens

    Dinosaurs once thought to be mini cousins of Tyrannosaurus rex may have been merely adolescent members of the famous species, a new study suggests.

  4. Physics

    Tests challenge whether centuries-old violins really are the best ever

    Some centuries-old Italian violins are reputed to be the best ever made. Scientists tested that. Their data now show new instruments can sound at least as good — and sometimes better.

  5. Tech

    Weird little fish inspires the development of super-grippers

    Suction-cup designers were inspired by the rock-grabbing tricks of the aptly named clingfish.

  6. Physics

    Musicians could benefit from teens’ research that pictures sound

    While in middle school, Hannah Shu and Isabelle Katz developed ways to picture musical tones. Their research could help everyone from instrument shoppers to vocal coaches.

  7. Chemistry

    Leftover opioids? Teen finds possible way to kill such pills

    Mercedes Randhahn, 14, of Ogden, Utah, came up with a possible way to chemically deactivate unused opioid pills. Her research paved the way to a $2,500 prize.

  8. Tech

    Teen’s research suggests spinning wing parts might boost aircraft safety

    An Arizona teen replaced an aircraft wing’s leading-edge flap with a spinning cylinder. This could increase lift, reduce drag and help prevent some aircraft stalls and spins, his data suggest.

  9. Tech

    Teen auto-safety researcher nabs $25,000 science fair prize

    Alaina Gassler took home the $25,000 top prize at the Broadcom MASTERS teen science competition. Her qualifying project could boost vehicle safety by eliminating blind spots for car drivers.

  10. Chemistry

    Fireworks shower the skies with science

    Filling the night sky with fireworks requires the help of chemists, electrical engineers and people who can choreograph theatrical shows.