HS-ESS3-4

Evaluate or refine a technological solution that reduces impacts of human activities on natural systems.

More Stories in HS-ESS3-4

  1. Chemistry

    Let’s learn about cellulose

    The world’s most abundant natural polymer is finding all kinds of new uses, in everything from ice cream to construction.

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  2. Tech

    This sun-powered system delivers energy as it pulls water from the air

    The device not only produces electricity but also harvests water for drinking or crops. It could be especially useful in remote and dry parts of the world.

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  3. Climate

    UN report calls for two-pronged approach to slow climate impacts

    The latest IPCC climate change report underscores an urgent need for action to avoid the worst consequences of global warming.

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  4. Materials Science

    A disinfectant made from sawdust knocks out deadly microbes

    It’s made by pressure-cooking sawdust and water, is cheap and easy to make — and could lead to greener cleaning products than chemicals used today.

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  5. Chemistry

    New process can transform urban CO2 pollution into a resource

    Researchers have developed a liquid metal that breaks down carbon dioxide in the air, converting it from a climate threat into a valuable raw material.

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  6. Space

    Space trash could kill satellites, space stations — and astronauts

    As private companies prepare to sprinkle space with tens of thousands of satellites, experts worry about the mushrooming threat of space junk.

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  7. Environment

    Widely used pesticides may threaten Earth’s ozone layer

    Data show a major class of long-used “eco-friendly” copper chemicals unexpectedly react with soil, making gases harmful to Earth’s protective ozone layer.

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  8. Environment

    Scientists Say: Pollution

    Pollution is any substance or form of energy released into the environment that is harmful to people or other living creatures.

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  9. Environment

    Clothes dryers may be a major source of airborne microplastics

    Scientists thought washing machines were a leading contributor of microplastics. Now it appears dryers may be an even bigger problem.

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