HS-PS3-2

Develop and use models to illustrate that energy at the macroscopic scale can be accounted for as either motions of particles or energy stored in fields.

More Stories in HS-PS3-2

  1. Materials Science

    Will bacterial ‘wires’ one day power your phone?

    An accidental discovery helps scientists generate electricity out of thin —but humid — air with bacteria-made protein nanowires.

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  2. Physics

    A contrast between shadows and light can now generate electricity

    A new device exploits the contrast between bright spots and shade to produce a current that can power small electronics.

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  3. Planets

    Glass beads help scientists puzzle out how baby planets grow

    Researchers have mimicked the first stages of planet formation in the lab. All they needed were glass beads and a catapult.

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  4. Materials Science

    The future of crystal-based solar energy just got brighter

    Researchers have upped the efficiency of layered solar cells that could be printed or painted onto surfaces. Now they are working to make them more rugged.

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  5. Chemistry

    Explainer: What are acids and bases?

    These chemistry terms tell us if a molecule is more likely to give up a proton or pick up a new one.

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  6. Physics

    Famous physics cat now alive, dead and in two boxes at once

    Splitting Erwin Schrödinger’s famous — and fictitious — cat between two boxes brings scientists one step closer to building quantum computers from microwaves.

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  7. Physics

    Scientists ‘see’ thunder for first time

    Scientists have captured the first image of thunder. The map shows the relative strengths of the sound waves emanating from the loud clap.

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  8. Tech

    Digital lighting goes organic

    An environmentally friendly lighting technology promises not only to save energy but also to transform our indoor environment.

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  9. Physics

    Student radiation experiment goes to space

    The Exploration Design Challenge asked students to design shields that would protect astronauts from radiation. Teachers can still involve classes in the challenge.

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