MS-ESS2-5

Collect data to provide evidence for how the motions and complex interactions of air masses results in changes in weather conditions.

More Stories in MS-ESS2-5

  1. Earth

    Here’s how lightning may help clean the air

    Airplane observations show that storm clouds can generate huge quantities of air-cleansing chemicals known as oxidants.

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  2. Climate

    Surfing the winds would make future jet travel greener

    Simple route changes could drastically cut fuel use and greenhouse-gas emissions, a new study finds.

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  3. Earth

    Explainer: What are aerosols?

    We may not see them, but tiny particles and droplets cloud the air, affecting its properties. Some may be pollutants, others all-natural products.

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  4. Climate

    Can wildfires cool the climate?

    Severe wildfires are becoming more common. Science is showing that the tiny particles they release into the air can alter Earth’s temperature — sometimes cooling it.

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  5. Earth

    Space station sensors saw how weird ‘blue jet’ lightning forms

    A mysterious type of lightning in the upper atmosphere has been traced to a brief, bright flash of light at the top of a storm cloud.

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  6. Earth

    Explainer: Our atmosphere — layer by layer

    Earth’s five layers extend from the ground up and into outer space. Each has its own distinct features and serves as the site of different activities and phenomena.

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  7. Environment

    Surprising long-haul dust and tar are melting high glaciers

    Dust and tar blown onto high mountains, like the Himalayas, boost the melting of snow and ice far more than scientists had realized. Here’s why.

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  8. Climate

    Siberian heat wave that caused an oil spill made more likely by climate change

    The six-month heat wave in Siberia during the first half of 2020 would not have happened without human-caused climate change, researchers find.

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  9. Environment

    Australian wildfires pumped smoke to record heights

    Wildfires in Australia in late December and early January spurred an unusual smoke plume that still hasn’t fully dispersed.

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