MS-LS1-3

Use argument supported by evidence for how the body is a system of interacting subsystems composed of groups of cells.

  1. Animals

    This mammal has the world’s slowest metabolism

    A sloth species manages to exist with a super-slow metabolism by moving little and using its environment for heating and cooling its body.

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  2. Brain

    Mapping word meanings in the brain

    A detailed new map shows that people comprehend words by using regions across the brain, not just in one dedicated language center.

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  3. Taking science to the track

    An athlete took on science research with a few friends and a heart monitor.

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  4. Animals

    Insects can patch their broken ‘bones’

    When insects suffer wounds, they can mend their ‘skeleton’ with a patch on the inside. This makes the leg strong again, new data show.

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  5. Fossils

    How to tell if a T. rex is expecting

    A chemical test of tyrannosaur bone can determine whether the dino was pregnant — and therefore a female.

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  6. Health & Medicine

    Allergies linked to obesity and heart risks

    Children and teens with asthma, allergies or other autoimmune conditions tend to be overweight and show symptoms of heart-disease risks, a new study finds.

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  7. Chemistry

    Some air pollutants seep through skin

    The skin is the body’s largest organ. And it can let in as much or more of certain air pollutants than enter through the lungs, a new study finds.

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  8. Tech

    New light on brain science

    A combination of physics, biology and engineering lets scientists use light to trigger actions by specific brain cells. Called optogenetics, this technology is shining new light on how the brain works.

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  9. Health & Medicine

    These bubbles treat wounds

    New research shows bubble-powered drugs can travel upstream, against the flow of blood, to seal wounds shut.

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  10. Animals

    Hummingbird tongues may be tiny pumps

    Scientists had thought that hummingbird tongues work through capillary action. A new study, though, concludes they work like little pumps.

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