MS-PS1-6

Undertake a design project to construct, test, and modify a device that either releases or absorbs thermal energy by chemical processes.

More Stories in MS-PS1-6

  1. Tech

    Flexible devices may help clothes solar power your screens

    A fluorescent polymer duo boosts the efficiency of solar cells. One day this material may coat your jacket, hat or backpack to provide power on the go.

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  2. Chemistry

    Study acid-base chemistry with at-home volcanoes

    Baking soda volcanoes are a fun demonstration, and with a few tweaks they can be an experiment, too

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  3. Physics

    The exotic ‘atom’ positronium surprises scientists

    New measurements of a weird but simple atom, one without a nucleus, suggest it may have unexpected properties. Scientists find this troubling.

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  4. Physics

    How to temporarily ‘fossilize’ a soap bubble

    Here’s how to freeze a soap bubble in midair. Warning: The environment needs to be frosty, and even then it can take a certain amount of trial and error.

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  5. Materials Science

    Here’s how to hide some objects from heat-sensing cameras

    A special coating that conceals temperature information from heat-detecting cameras might someday be used as a privacy shield.

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  6. Materials Science

    Self-powered surface may evaluate table-tennis play

    Scientists at the Georgia Institute of Technology built a 'smart' surface on which to play table tennis. It can track the location, speed and direction of the ball.

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  7. Physics

    Here’s how quantum mechanics lets heat cross a vacuum

    Heat can move across a vacuum if the span is small enough. As in really, really small. In a new experiment, the gap was only a few hundred nanometers.

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  8. Materials Science

    The future of crystal-based solar energy just got brighter

    Researchers have upped the efficiency of layered solar cells that could be printed or painted onto surfaces. Now they are working to make them more rugged.

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  9. Chemistry

    Hard-to-burn ‘smart’ wallpaper even triggers alarms

    Scientists have made wallpaper that won’t easily burn. And embedded nanowires can be linked to a sensor to sound an alarm when the paper gets too hot.

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