Animals

  1. Animals

    Are coyotes moving into your neighborhood?

    How do coyotes survive in New York City, Los Angeles and Chicago? Researchers and citizen scientists are working together to find answers.

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  2. Tech

    Here’s the summer science you might have missed

    From sizzling Siberia and ‘smart’ toilets, to new uses for astronaut pee, more than COVID-19 made news this summer.

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  3. Environment

    Busy beavers may be speeding thaw of Arctic permafrost

    As climate change continues, busy beavers are expanding their range in Alaska. Their dams could further speed the loss of permafrost there and promote local warming.

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  4. Animals

    Analyze This: Hurricanes may help lizards evolve better grips

    Lizards have larger toepads in areas that tend to have higher hurricane activity. This suggests high winds select for those that can hang tight.

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  5. Fossils

    American crocs seem to descend from kin that crossed the Atlantic

    A fossil hints that early crocodiles crossed over from Africa, millions of years ago, to colonize a new land.

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  6. Animals

    Viral scents? Dogs sniff out coronavirus in human sweat

    Researchers train dogs to sniff out COVID-19. In the United Arab Emirates, sniffer dogs have already begun identifying infected passengers at airports.

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  7. Animals

    To figure out your dog’s ‘real’ age, you’ll need a calculator

    What’s your dog’s human-equivalent age? Just multiply how old it is times seven, right? Uh, no. And here’s why.

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  8. Animals

    Superblack fish can disappear in the deep sea’s darkness

    Some fish that live in the ocean’s depths are superblack due to a special layer of light-absorbing structures in their skin.

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  9. Animals

    Dolphins can learn from their peers how to use shells as tools

    Some bottlenose dolphins seem to look to their peers, rather than mom, to learn how to trap prey in shells.

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  10. Physics

    Flying snakes wriggle their way through the air

    Flying snakes go tens of meters (yards) without wings. They do it by undulating back and forth and up and down, a new study shows.

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  11. Animals

    What you need to know about ‘murder hornets’

    Two new specimens of the world’s largest hornet have just turned up in the United States. Here’s what to make of them and other alien-hornet invaders.

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  12. Ecosystems

    Pooping ducks can shed the live eggs of fish

    Some carp eggs survived and even hatched after being pooped by a duck. This may help explain how invasive fish reach isolated waterways.

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