Earth

More Stories in Earth

  1. Health & Medicine

    Warning: Wildfires might make you itch

    Western wildfires are on the rise due to climate change and land use. Now a study adds eczema to the list of health risks that smoke might trigger.

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  2. Climate

    Climate may have sent drift of the North Pole toward Greenland

    This mid-1990s shift in the pole’s movement was driven by glacial melt. And that was triggered in part by climate change, a new study reports.

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  3. Earth

    Only 3 percent of Earth’s land is unchanged by people

    A sweeping survey of land-based ecosystems finds that very few still support all the animals they used to. Reintroducing lost species could help.

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  4. Agriculture

    New technologies might help keep drought-prone farms green

    After learning how much damage drought can do to crops, two teens designed ways to detect a thirsty plant and make sure it gets enough water.

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  5. Environment

    Local glacier could be gone in a decade, young scientist finds

    A teen calculated the volume of a glacier by drilling into it with jets of steam — then used that to estimate how long before all its ice will be gone.

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  6. Earth

    Here’s how lightning may help clean the air

    Airplane observations show that storm clouds can generate huge quantities of air-cleansing chemicals known as oxidants.

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  7. Ecosystems

    Urchin takeover underlies California’s vanishing kelp forests

    Some 95 percent of kelp forests along its northern coast are gone. Meanwhile, sea otters are helping slow the loss of surviving kelp farther south.

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  8. Chemistry

    New recycling technologies could keep more plastic out of landfills

    Recycling plastics is really hard — especially into useful materials. But new chemical tricks could make recycling easier.

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  9. Microbes

    Several plant-like algae can morph into animal-like predators

    Single-celled green algae swim through water as free cells. Most use only photosynthesis for their energy. But not all of them, a new study shows.

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