Earth

  1. Humans

    Changing climates can take cooling tips from warm regions

    When summer heat waves hit northern cities, people might look to keep cool using tropical building strategies — and forgotten architectural wisdom.

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  2. Chemistry

    How to recycle ‘nonrecyclable’ plastics

    A new process can convert some nonrecyclable plastics into a type that now can be reused. That could greatly cut down on wastes sent to landfills.

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  3. Environment

    Analyze This: Perfumes from everyday products collect in distant ice

    Common scent-bearing chemicals are trapped in ice cored from Europe’s tallest peak. Dig into the data to find a story behind that pollution.

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  4. Animals

    One tiny sea parasite survives 200 times atmospheric pressure

    Known as the seal louse, this tiny insect can survive deep oceanic dives on its mobile home, a marine mammal.

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  5. Animals

    Whale blowholes don’t keep out seawater

    Whales’ blowholes aren’t as protective as scientists had thought. They not only can let in water but also pollutants.

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  6. Chemistry

    New solution for carbon dioxide: Turn it into ‘green’ fuel

    Chemists have created a new way to convert carbon dioxide into ethanol. It might one day help remove excess CO2 — a greenhouse gas — from the air.

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  7. Animals

    A single chemical may draw lonely locusts into a hungry swarm

    Swarms of locusts can destroy crops. Scientists have discovered a chemical that might make locusts come together in huge hungry swarms.

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  8. Tech

    Here’s the summer science you might have missed

    From sizzling Siberia and ‘smart’ toilets, to new uses for astronaut pee, more than COVID-19 made news this summer.

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  9. Microbes

    Some deep-seafloor microbes still alive after 100 million years!

    Some starving microbes nap while awaiting their next meal. For some living miles below the ocean surface, that nap may exceed 100 million years.

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  10. Environment

    Busy beavers may be speeding thaw of Arctic permafrost

    As climate change continues, busy beavers are expanding their range in Alaska. Their dams could further speed the loss of permafrost there and promote local warming.

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  11. Health & Medicine

    Dust can infect animals with flu, raising coronavirus concerns

    Dust particles kicked up from some virus-contaminated surface can become a source of new infections, rodent data show.

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  12. Agriculture

    Scientists Say: Carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are molecules with carbon, oxygen and hydrogen. Animals break down these chemicals in food to get energy.

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