Life

  1. Genetics

    What would it take to make a unicorn?

    Onward’s dumpster-diving unicorns seem like an impossibility. But scientists have some ideas about how unicorns could become real.

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  2. Fossils

    Scientists Say: Fossil

    Under the right conditions, living things or traces they’ve left behind can be preserved in rock for a long time — millions or billions of years.

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  3. Health & Medicine

    Search speeds up for vaccine against the new coronavirus

    Scientists are investigating unusual ways to make drugs to prevent viral infections. One may even be able to treat already sick people.

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  4. Animals

    Ouch! Jellyfish snot can hurt people who never touch the animal

    A goo shed by at least one species of upside-down jellyfish contains stinging cells. They can cause pain even to creatures that never touch the jelly.

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  5. Health & Medicine

    Concussions leave clues in the blood

    Athletes who suffered concussions had increased blood levels of three proteins. These proteins appear to be a chemical sign of the brain injury.

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  6. Animals

    How an encounter with this odd-looking bird inspired a career

    Kevin Burgio overcame many hardships to become a scientist. Now he studies how animals like the Carolina parakeet and Tasmanian tiger went extinct.

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  7. Animals

    Analyze This: Shimmering colors may help beetles hide

    Delve into data showing how brilliant colors that shift as a viewer — or predator — moves may help iridescent insects blend in.

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  8. Brain

    Easily distracted? Training your brain’s activity could help

    People can train their brainwaves to direct their attention, scientists have now shown. The technique may someday be able to help people focus.

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  9. Brain

    Curiosity drives this neuroscientist and artist

    Christine Liu studies the brain on nicotine — and used Instagram to bring together women doing incredible science.

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  10. Animals

    The many efforts to lick cat allergies

    Up to one in five people around the world may be allergic to cats. Science is coming to help their desire for kitty cuddles.

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  11. Health & Medicine

    Immune arms-race in bats may make their viruses deadly to people

    An overactive immune system may help bats avoid being sickened by many viruses. This may viruses becoming stronger — and deadlier — when they hit other species.

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  12. Animals

    Drones might one day capture a dolphin’s breath in midair

    High-speed footage of dolphin spray reveals that droplets blast upward at speeds close to 100 kilometers per hour.

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