Life

  1. Plants

    Scientists Say: Pollen

    Pollen is a mass of tiny reproductive cells. These grains combine with egg cells to form seeds — but on the way, they can make some people miserable.

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  2. Tech

    No animal died to make this steak

    The ribeye steak is the first of its kind, and the latest in a growing list of meats printed with a 3-D bioprinter instead of being harvested from an animal.

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  3. Genetics

    Europe’s ancient humans often hooked up with Neandertals

    DNA from ancient bones shows humans and Neandertals were regularly mixing genes by about 45,000 years ago.

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  4. Ecosystems

    Analyze This: Invasive species cost the world billions each year

    A new study estimates that invasive species have cost the world more than $1 trillion since 1970. That’s almost certainly an underestimate.

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  5. Fossils

    Rhinos, camels and bone-crushing dogs once roamed Nebraska

    Scientists digging into the remnants of an ancient watering hole in Nebraska discovered evidence of an Africa-like savanna, complete with rhinos.

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  6. Life

    These rabbits can’t hop. A gene defect makes them do handstands

    Mutations in a gene that helps nerve cells work properly rob rabbits of their ability to hop. Instead, the animals use their front paws to move.

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  7. Animals

    Explainer: What are cicadas?

    There are more than 3,000 species of cicadas, but the best known in North America are periodical cicadas, which emerge every 13 or 17 years.

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  8. Animals

    How bees play telephone to form a swarm

    Honeybees use pheromones and flapping wings to tell each other where to find the queen — so they can all be together.

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  9. Life

    Scientists Say: Genus

    A genus is a group of closely related species. It’s the first part of the two-part system called binomial nomenclature, used to name living things.

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  10. Ecosystems

    Urchin takeover underlies California’s vanishing kelp forests

    Some 95 percent of kelp forests along its northern coast are gone. Meanwhile, sea otters are helping slow the loss of surviving kelp farther south.

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  11. Life

    Let’s learn about dogs

    From learning the names of their toys to sniffing out viruses in human sweat, dogs are far more than household pets.

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  12. Brain

    Patterns in brain activity can identify who will struggle to read

    Certain patterns of brain activity predict whether teens are strong readers or will struggle. Those diagnostic patterns show up even when doing math.

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