Materials Science

More Stories in Materials Science

  1. Materials Science

    Let’s learn about the future of smart clothing

    Researchers are fashioning new materials to make clothes more comfortable and convenient.

    By
  2. Materials Science

    New cloth cools you when you’re hot, warms you when you’re cold

    Scientists 3-D printed the new fabric, which has even more tricks up its sleeve — such as conducting electricity and resisting radio waves.

    By
  3. Materials Science

    Engineers borrow a tree’s cellulose to toughen new materials

    Cellulose gives plants their strength. Engineers are turning this renewable, environmentally friendly resource into brand new materials.

    By
  4. Materials Science

    A disinfectant made from sawdust knocks out deadly microbes

    It’s made by pressure-cooking sawdust and water, is cheap and easy to make — and could lead to greener cleaning products than chemicals used today.

    By
  5. Chemistry

    New process can transform urban CO2 pollution into a resource

    Researchers have developed a liquid metal that breaks down carbon dioxide in the air, converting it from a climate threat into a valuable raw material.

    By
  6. Environment

    ‘Mining’ cryptocurrencies pollutes the real world

    Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies exist only online. Yet the environmental impacts of their networks affect the real world.

    By
  7. Environment

    How we choose to pay has hidden costs for the planet

    Whether cash or credit, phone apps or digital currencies — all forms of payment have behind-the-scenes costs. And these can vary dramatically.

    By
  8. Environment

    Clothes dryers may be a major source of airborne microplastics

    Scientists thought washing machines were a leading contributor of microplastics. Now it appears dryers may be an even bigger problem.

    By
  9. Materials Science

    Let’s learn about glass

    Unlike the atoms in other solids, the atoms in glass don’t exist in an orderly crystal structure. They’re more jumbled up, like the atoms inside liquids.

    By