Physics

  1. Physics

    Let’s learn about bubbles

    Bubbles are a great way to while away a beautiful summer day. Knowing a bit of science can help you blow the biggest and the best bubbles.

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  2. Earth

    Did rain put the Kilauea volcano’s lava-making into overdrive?

    Scientists share strongly conflicting opinions about why Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano spewed an overabundance of lava in 2018.

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  3. Animals

    Minecraft’s big bees don’t exist, but giant insects once did

    Big bees buzz in Minecraft. In our world, blocky bees might starve and be stuck on the ground. Yet long ago, giant insects did roam our planet.

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  4. Physics

    Science offers recipes for homemade coronavirus masks

    New studies provide data on what types of mask materials protect best against the virus that causes COVID-19. They also point to the value of a really snug fit.

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  5. Materials Science

    Micro-barbs could make shots less painful

    A new type of microneedle design might take the sting out of shots and stick to the skin better than other approaches.

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  6. Earth

    Let’s learn about earthquakes

    Dozens of quakes happen every day, but most aren’t big enough for people to notice.

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  7. Materials Science

    This ‘living’ concrete slurps up a greenhouse gas

    Microbes help harden a mix of sand and gelatin into a living concrete that could interact with people and the environment in great new ways.

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  8. Physics

    Explainer: Rainbows, fogbows and their eerie cousins

    Light shining through a water droplet can make more than just a rainbow. A range of other colorful arcs also can develop.

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  9. Climate

    How to curb the climate heating by contrails

    Contrails are narrow clouds left behind in the sky by jets. They add to climate change. But a new study suggests a way to curb their contribution.

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  10. Animals

    Scientists Say: Echolocation

    This word describes a method that some animals use to sense their environments by making sounds and listening for their echoes.

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  11. Tech

    Here’s one way to harvest water right out of the air

    Need water but you have no access to rain, lakes or groundwater? Materials known as metal-organic frameworks could be used to slurp that water from the air, new data show.

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  12. Health & Medicine

    Six foot social-distancing will not always be enough for COVID-19

    To avoid COVID-19, keeping a 6-foot social distance is a good rule of thumb. But for plenty of instances, that might not be nearly far enough.

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